Apple Podcasts : Canada : Science & Medicine : Episodes
In the first episode of G, Radiolab’s miniseries on intelligence, we went back to the 1970s to meet a group of Black parents who put the IQ test on trial. The lawsuit, Larry P v Riles, ended with a ban on IQ tests for all Black students in the state of California, a ban that’s still in place...
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Are some ideas so dangerous we shouldn’t even talk about them? That question brought Radiolab’s senior editor, Pat Walters, to a subject that at first he thought was long gone: the measuring of human intelligence with IQ tests. Turns out, the tests are all around us. In the workplace. The...
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Are women named Virginia more likely to move to Virginia? Are people with the last name of Carpenter more likely to be carpenters? This week on Hidden Brain, we bring you a favorite 2017 episode about our preference for things that remind us of ourselves, and why this tendency can have larger...
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Are sharks the super-predators we think they are? Or have we been baited with great white lies? To find out, we interviewed shark researchers Dr. Taylor Chapple, Dr. Tricia Meredith and Dr. Chris Pepin-Neff, along with surfer Mike Wells. Check out the full transcript here. Selected...
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In this episode of the podcast, Sam Harris speaks with his wife, Annaka Harris, about her new book, "Conscious: A Brief Guide to the Fundamental Mystery of the Mind." You can support the Making Sense Podcast and receive subscriber-only content at samharris.org/subscribe.
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Private vs public space exploration, asteroid mining, artificial intelligence, universal healthcare, and more – Neil Tyson explores the stochastic world of economics with Stephen J. Dubner, author of Freakonomics and host of Freakonomics Radio, and first-time comic co-host James...
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How a sunken nuclear submarine, a crazy billionaire, and a mechanical claw gave birth to a phrase that has hounded journalists and lawyers for 40 years and embodies the tension between the public’s desire for transparency and the government’s need to keep secrets.    
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News Items: Theory of Everything, FBI Bigfoot Files, Starlink, Evaluating Chernobyl; Who's That Noisy; Your Questions and E-mails: Closest Planet, Married Bliss; Science or Fiction
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On a Tuesday afternoon back in the summer of 2017, Scotty Hatton and Scottie Wightman both made a decision to help someone in need. They both paid a price for their actions that day, which have led to a legal, moral, and scientific puzzle about how we balance accountability and forgiveness.  In...
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Andrew Urdiales, a serial killer with military training, attacks and tortures women across three states for ten years. Only one woman lives to the tell her harrowing tale; but with no evidence left behind, how many years will pass until justice is served?
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Generations of Americans have struggled against segregation. Most of us believe in the ideal of a colorblind society. But what happens when that ideal come up against research that finds colorblindness sometimes leads to worse outcomes?
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In our first ever Quirks & Quarks public debate, recorded live in Toronto, astronaut Chris Hadfield, cosmologist Renée Hložek, planetary scientist Marianne Mader and space flight historian Amy Shira Teitel weigh in on whether we should leave space to the robots. An extended podcast edition...
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In this episode of the podcast, Sam Harris speaks with Adam Grant about the social science of the workplace. They discuss how teams work effectively, the nature of power, personality types and fundamental styles of interaction, the critical skill of saying “no,” creativity, resilience, the...
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The planet Venus might seem a hellish destination and an unlikely place to find extraterrestrial life. And yet, many experts agree that life may have existed in the planet's ancient oceans -- and may thrive yet within the upper atmosphere. Join Robert and Joe in a quest for Venusian aliens....
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Kimberly Morgan was attracted to Christopher Duntsch from the moment she met him. He was charming and seemed destined for great things. But she also saw another side to him. Duntsch’s behavior led many people who came into contact with him to wonder: Was he an impaired physician? A terrible...
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Back in 2003 Belgium was holding a national election. One of their first where the votes would be cast and counted on computers. Thousands of hours of preparation went into making it unhackable. And when the day of the vote came, everything seemed to have gone well. That was, until a cosmic chain...
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Dr. May Cohen is a member of the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame and an Officer of the Order of Canada. Early in her career as a family doctor, Dr. Cohen fought for legal access to abortion, which she saw as a fundamental part of women’s health. She tells Dr. Brian Goldman about her experiences...
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Is natural selection REALLY survival of the fittest? In this episode of Stuff to Blow Your Mind, Robert and Joe discuss where the phrase comes from and how well it actually matches up with our understanding of evolution. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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If a doctor is fired from a hospital, you have to do two things: the first, is to report them to the state medical board. Baylor-Plano did not do that to Dr. Duntsch. They also did not do the second, which is report him to the National Practitioner Data Bank. This is how hospitals keep up...
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Chris Duntsch was a promising medical student, with a bright future ahead of him. The friends who knew him were shocked at the doctor he would later become. Not Chris, they said. That’s not the man I know. The Chris Duntsch they knew was driven, hard-working, smart, with a twinkle in his eye. And...
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Many of us intuitively feel that the bitter partisanship of American politics is bad for our nation. So should we be concerned about the health of our democracy? This week on Hidden Brain, we revisit two of our favorite conversations about U.S. politics. We start by talking with political...
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All physicians are taught, “First do no harm.” But what happens when a doctor does harm his patients? Dr. Robert Henderson was a veteran spinal surgeon in Dallas when he got an unusual phone call from a local hospital: a new surgeon had operated so poorly that a patient who’d walked in on her...
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Consider this episode of Science Rules! a user manual for how you think, feel and remember, as we explore the nature of consciousness with neuroscientist Dr. Heather Berlin. This episode is sponsored by Progressive Insurance (www.progressive.com), ZipRecruiter...
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Using high-powered ballistics experiments, fancy computer algorithms, and good old-fashioned ancient geology, scientists have woven together a theory about the extinction of the dinosaurs that is so precise, so hot, so instantaneous, as to seem unimaginable. Today, we bring you this story, first...
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Neil deGrasse Tyson and virtuoso comedian, musician, and actor Jack Black explore black holes, a simulation universe, quantum weirdness, Powers of Ten, Ant Man’s shrinking powers, and much more. With Chuck Nice, astrophysicist Charles Liu, climate scientist Kate Marvel, and Bill Nye. Photo...
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Michelle Shughart has her work cut out for her, since no doctor has ever been prosecuted for crimes committed while practicing medicine. His patient’s lives would never be the same, but what would what would be the fate of Dr. Duntsch? The people in Dallas struggle to understand what drove him to...
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In this episode of the podcast, Sam Harris speaks with Benjamin Wittes about both volumes of the Mueller Report. You can support the Making Sense Podcast and receive subscriber-only content at samharris.org/subscribe.
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Dr. Henderson and Dr. Kirby were screaming for anyone to listen who might help them get Dr. Duntsch to stop operating. Kirby wrote to the Texas Medical Board. He and Henderson went to the police. But no one was listening. Please tell us what you think about our show and help us by answering a...
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When President Garfield was shot by an assassin in 1881, the best and brightest in medicine and science did everything they could to save him - and turned the President into a human guinea pig. But they missed something big, that could have saved him. To find out what it was, we spoke to surgeon...
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Bigfoot And Alien Encounter
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Reporter Laura Beil has a few updates on the story of Christopher Duntsch since the series was first released. She attends an appeals hearing for Duntsch's case, discusses Baylor-Plano Hospital’s response -- and the mysterious case of the disappearing billboard. Subscribe to Business Wars...
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During World War II, something happened that nobody ever talks about. This is a tale of mysterious balloons, cowboy sheriffs, and young children caught up in the winds of war. And silence, the terror of silence. Reporters Peter Lang-Stanton and Nick Farago tell us the story of a seemingly...
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It happens to all of us: someone recognizes you on the street, calls you by name, and says hello. You, meanwhile, have no idea who that person is. Researchers say this struggle to read other faces is common. This week on Hidden Brain, we revisit a favorite 2016 episode about "super-recognizers"...
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What IS an island? How do birds and plants and mammals GET there? Why do we like going to islands? Dr. Andy Kraemer studies how life populates and survives on hunks of remote rock and chats all about the Galapagos Islands -- where he does his research. We address the smallest island in the world,...
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In the episode of the podcast, Sam Harris speaks with Nicholas Christakis about his new book, "Blueprint: The Evolutionary Origins of a Good Society." You can support the Making Sense Podcast and receive subscriber-only contentatsamharris.org/subscribe.
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Smarts matter. But other factors may play an even bigger role in whether someone succeeds. This week, we speak with Nobel Prize-winning economist James Heckman about the skills that predict how you'll fare in life. We'll also look at programs that build these skills in the neediest of children –...
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In 1903 the US Supreme Court refused to say that Isabel González was a citizen of the United States. Then again, they said, she wasn’t a exactly an immigrant either. And they said that the US territory of Puerto Rico, Isabel’s home, was “foreign to the United States in a domestic sense.” Since...
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When Nancy Holten was 8 years old her mom put her in a moving van. She fell asleep, woke up in Switzerland, and she's been there ever since. Nancy is big into animal rights, crystals, and various forms of natural and holistic healing. She’s also a viral sensation: the Dutch woman apparently so...
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The process of vetting those we allow into our lives is a precarious one. When young, prospective college student Brandy Rosine met Jade Olmstead online, it seemed to be love at first Skype. Things were going smoothly for the couple, they began living together for a short while until a restless...
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Peanut allergy in children has been on the rise since the 1990s. What’s to blame? We find a clue in a very unexpected place, and talk to pediatric allergist Prof. Gideon Lack. Check out the full transcript here: https://bit.ly/2W7IwmASelected References: Gideon’s landmark 2015 study:...
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We're consuming a lot of plastic and have no idea of the risks; Canada is using science to lay claim to the North Pole; The elephant's mathematical trunk can smell numbers; Depressing conclusion as new research reverses 25 years of research; Concussion symptoms reversed in mice using magnetic...
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On this very special crossover episode with our friend Matt Candeias from In Defense of Plants, we’re switching things up from poison to remedy, focusing on the plant-derived wonder drug, aspirin! We cover the ancient use of salicylic acid-containing willow bark to relieve pain and fevers and...
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On October 10th, 2008, 38-year-old Johnny Altinger made his way to South Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. He had set up a date with a mysterious woman on the website Plenty of Fish. He emailed friends and family about his big date, even forwarding the directions of where he was heading to. A few days...
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The judges reviewing Christopher Duntsch’s appeal have reached a verdict. On the day of the decision, Laura Beil goes to the Dallas District Attorney’s office to speak with prosecutors Michelle Shugart and Jaclyn Lambert about the judges' decision. To read Laura Beil’s article about the ruling,...
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In this episode of the podcast, Sam Harris speaks with Shane Parrish about some of the mental models that should guide our thinking and behavior. You can support the Making Sense Podcast and receive subscriber-only content at samharris.org/subscribe.
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A young woman discovers a pattern in her dating habits that disturbs her - a pattern that challenges her very conception of who she is and what she believes in. The realization sets her off on a quest to change her attractions. But is this even possible? And should we be hacking our desire to...
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This series has generated a lot of questions and comments from listeners for host and reporter Laura Beil. In this special interview episode, Laura talks with David Brown (from the podcast “Business Wars”) about a number of topics that have intrigued listeners, like how Duntsch could have...
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You may remember the woman in the infomercial about Dr. Duntsch who admiringly calls him “one great man” and claims “he’ll fix you.” Laura Beil wasn’t able to get in touch with her when she first reported the series. She guessed that the woman must have been a paid actress, or perhaps even the...
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C’est grâce aux radars de détection des avions de la Seconde Guerre mondiale et à une barre de chocolat qu’a été inventé le four à micro-ondes. Après la guerre, l’ingénieur américain Percy Spencer s’est rendu compte par hasard qu’une onde du radar, le magnétron, pouvait aussi faire chauffer des...
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We’ve known for more than 200 years that cities are hotter than surrounding rural areas. All that concrete and brick soaks up the sun’s rays, then re-emits them as heat long after night has fallen. On top of that, waste heat from the energy we use to power our buildings, vehicle emissions, and...
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