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"Criminal Justice" During the Long Eighteenth Century
Theatre, Representation & Emotion in the Courtroom & the Public Sphere
This conference addresses important changes in the representation of crime, litigation, and justice in Britain over the period 1660-1850, and particularly the constitution of public opinion about justice by "performances" which touched the emotions. The principal objective is to encourage a second wave of historical studies relating to the "theatre" of justice in this period; one that builds upon earlier work by transcending the boundary between courtrooms and the public gaze and recognizing the importance of representation and performance.
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Ratings & Reviews
Brilliant !
If you love history, especially how people lived through and thought about crime, this podcast delves deep into the historical zeitgeist. Fascinating listening experience. Lis ( Australia)
Lislucy via Apple Podcasts · Australia · 12/13/19
Recent Episodes
Hal Gladfelder discusses, "'The Dogs of Law': On the Criminal Trial as Tale of Terror". Gladfelder is Senior Lecturer in 18th & 19th Century Literature & Culture at the University of Manchester. This talk was included in the conference session topic titled, “Communities of Feelings:...
Published 11/02/13
Allyson N. May discusses, "Dickensian Sensibilities at the Bar: The Advocacy of Charles Phillips". May is Professor of History at the University of Western Ontario. This talk was included in the conference session topic titled, “Communities of Feelings: Lawyers, Narratives, and Literature”.
Published 11/02/13
David Lemmings discusses, "Thomas Erskine and the Performance of Moral Sentiments: The Emotional Reportage of Trials for 'Criminal Conversation' in the 1790s". Lemmings is Professor of History at the University of Adelaide. This talk was included in the conference session topic titled, “Truth,...
Published 11/02/13
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