Episodes
Our last episode about proteins discussed protein structure. What happens when protein has little or no structure? Let’s learn to be scientifically conversational. For all references and supplemental information, you can navigate to ascienceshow.com.
Published 04/29/21
It's time for an April update for the coronavirus vaccines that are being deployed worldwide. What's going on with Johnson and Johnson and do we need that third Pfizer dose? Do we know? Let's learn to be scientifically conversational. For all references and supplemental information, you can navigate to ascienceshow.com.
Published 04/22/21
A bad apple spoils the bunch. So now you’re left without a bunch of apples. In an age that lends itself to immediate availability of food, this might not feel like such an issue, but what about before common food preservation techniques? Let’s learn to be scientifically conversational. For all references and supplemental information, you can navigate to ascienceshow.com.
Published 04/15/21
We’ve previously discussed ticks as arthropod vectors, but there is clearly more to this organism than carrying human pathogens. What is a tick? Why do they matter and why might someone study them? Let’s learn to be scientifically conversational. For all references and supplemental information, you can navigate to ascienceshow.com.
Published 04/08/21
To maintain an open and rigorous basis for scientific discovery, there must be firm rules and understandings about academic dishonesty. What are some different forms of academic dishonesty and why would they occur? Let’s learn to be scientifically conversational. For all references and supplemental information, you can navigate to ascienceshow.com.
Published 04/01/21
Science is a global effort undertaken by individuals of vastly different backgrounds. What inspires someone to be a scientist? How different can each person’s path be? Let’s learn to be scientifically conversational. For all references and supplemental information, you can navigate to ascienceshow.com.
Published 03/25/21
This podcast has previously discussed enteroviruses that are not poliovirus, but we haven’t had the chance to delve into clinical presentations of infection. What is acute flaccid myelitis? Why is it relevant for human health across the globe? Let’s learn to be scientifically conversational. For all references and supplemental information, you can navigate to ascienceshow.com.
Published 03/18/21
This show has talked about organelles, cell culture, and organs themselves. Today, we discuss a new technique to be able to study a variety of medically relevant scientific topics. What are organoids? Let’s learn to be scientifically conversational. For all references and supplemental information, you can navigate to ascienceshow.com.
Published 03/11/21
Sometimes it’s hard to define philosophical concepts scientifically; often it’s troubling to consider science philosophically. Today we’ll talk about consciousness and how Homo sapien sapiens fit into the kingdom of animalia and beyond. This is a Monday released episode making up for the first of three missed weeks in 2021. For all references and supplemental information, you can navigate to ascienceshow.com. For all references and supplemental information, you can navigate...
Published 03/08/21
Sometimes it’s hard to define philosophical concepts scientifically; often it’s troubling to consider science philosophically. Today we’ll talk about consciousness and how Homo sapien sapiens fit into the kingdom of animalia and beyond. Let’s learn to be scientifically conversational. For all references and supplemental information, you can navigate to ascienceshow.com.
Published 03/04/21
In 2020, approximately 1.8 million people will be diagnosed with cancer in the United States alone. Last time, we discussed the basic foundations of cancer. Today, we talk about gene products responsible for reducing the prevalence of cancer and the consequences of missing those gene products. Let’s learn to be scientifically conversational.   For all references and supplemental information, you can navigate to ascienceshow.com.
Published 02/25/21
What’s in a name? Would that which we call a rose by any other name smell as sweet? Maybe. But what we call groups of organisms is about more than just a catchy title; studying speciation gives us greater insight into how evolution and biodiversity exist in our world. Let's learn to be scientifically conversational. For all references and supplemental information, you can navigate to ascienceshow.com.
Published 02/18/21
After a couple of weeks of virology and immunology, it’s time to step back into the world of organismal biology. What is a lizard? What is a squamate? What is some of their evolutionary history? Let’s learn to be scientifically conversational.   For all references and supplemental information, you can navigate to ascienceshow.com.
Published 02/11/21
Last week we discussed vaccines at a 50,000 foot perspective, but today we focus on vaccines for one pathogen: SARS-CoV-2. Let’s learn to be scientifically conversational.   For all references and supplemental information, you can navigate to ascienceshow.com.
Published 02/04/21
Oh boy, another nail biter! Today, we have to discuss the topic of vaccines. Are vaccines effective? If so, at what? Are they safe? Of course, to all of those questions, but still. Let’s learn to be scientifically conversational.   For all references and supplemental information, you can navigate to ascienceshow.com.
Published 01/28/21
A truly tall episode. Today, we’ll discuss the majesty of the redwood tree and how they contribute to their local ecosystems. Let’s learn to be scientifically conversational. For all references and supplemental information, you can navigate to ascienceshow.com.
Published 12/10/20
There’s more to Salmonella than just Salmonellosis. What is salmonella? Why is it often related to foodborne illness? Let’s learn to be scientifically conversational. For all references and supplemental information, you can navigate to ascienceshow.com.
Published 12/03/20
Many scientists have adapted Hollywood’s traditional “elevator pitch”: a brief, persuasive spiel that you use to spark interest in you, your organization, or your product. Today, we’ll take that elevator pitch to its roots to compete for who can propose a ‘better’ science television show for a non-scientist audience. Let’s learn to be scientifically conversational.   For all references and supplemental information, you can navigate to ascienceshow.com.
Published 11/26/20
A common misconception is that electrons orbit the nucleus of an atom, like a planet around the sun. Why is this wrong? What are atomic orbitals? Let’s learn to be scientifically conversational. For all references and supplemental information, you can navigate to ascienceshow.com.
Published 11/19/20
Scientific progress is fueled by scientific publication. What is a scientific journal? Why do scientists rely on them? Who is responsible for vetting that work? Let’s learn to be scientifically conversational. For all references and supplemental information, you can navigate to ascienceshow.com.
Published 11/12/20
The show has previously spoken with elected officials, but never during a time of a public health crisis. Today, we discuss Chapel Hill’s response to COVID19. Let’s learn to be scientifically conversational. For all references and supplemental information, you can navigate to ascienceshow.com.
Published 11/05/20
Scientific progress costs cold, hard cash. For US governmental agencies, many of which not-for-profit, this money comes from the taxpayer. How does this process work? Is one party more likely to support scientific progress? Let’s learn to be scientifically conversational. Also, go vote. For all references and supplemental information, you can navigate to ascienceshow.com.
Published 10/29/20
You don’t have to be the big cat to be the top dog. Today, we’ll discuss how our feline friends impact the world and natural world around us. Let’s learn to be scientifically conversational.   For all references and supplemental information, you can navigate to ascienceshow.com.
Published 10/22/20
We’ve discussed the concept of the genome and the individual genes that make it up, but this show hasn’t yet delved into how that blueprint expresses you. Today, we discuss exceptions to what Gregor Mendel discovered. Let’s learn to be scientifically conversational. For all references and supplemental information, you can navigate to ascienceshow.com.
Published 10/15/20
We’ve discussed the concept of the genome and the individual genes that make it up, but this show hasn’t yet delved into how that blueprint expresses you. Today, we discuss genetics and the early scientist Gregor Mendel. Let’s learn to be scientifically conversational. For all references and supplemental information, you can navigate to ascienceshow.com.
Published 10/08/20