Episodes
“For Palestinians, agriculture seems to be the only option. This is why we see the vicious, atrocious, and systematic attacks against Palestinian farmers.” In this episode, we welcome Rami Barhoush, an activist and president of the Arab Group for the Protection of Nature, known as APN, based in Amman, Jordan. The independent non-profit organization seeks to enhance the capacity of Arab peoples, including those living under occupation and armed conflicts, to protect, sustain, and...
Published 05/17/22
“If you’re actually targeting migrants as the source of the problem, if we’re thinking about climate migration as one of the amplified 'threats' from the Department of Defense’s point of view, then you’re never actually going to solve the problem because you’re only addressing the symptom and not the root cause.” In this episode, we welcome A. Naomi Paik, an interdisciplinary scholar whose work examines the relationship between law and cultural politics, centering racism, state violence, and...
Published 05/03/22
"“There’s a lot of evidence that the world, and our experience of life, has massively sped up... We’re all speed-reading life now, and we’re living at a pace that makes deep thought impossible.” In this episode, we welcome Johann Hari, a writer and journalist who has written for the New York Times, Le Monde, The Guardian and other newspapers. His TED talks and NowThis viral video have been viewed almost 100 million times, and his work has been praised by a broad range of people. Johann is...
Published 04/26/22
In this episode, we welcome Jason W. Moore, an environmental historian and historical geographer at Binghamton University, where he is professor of sociology. He is author or editor of several books: most recently, of Capitalism in the Web of Life; and, with Raj Patel, A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things. His books and essays on environmental history, capitalism, and social theory have been widely recognized, and he coordinates the World-Ecology Research Network.  Support our...
Published 04/19/22
In this episode, we welcome Jessica Hernandez, a transnational Indigenous scholar, scientist, and community advocate based in the Pacific Northwest. Her work is grounded in her Indigenous cultures and ways of knowing. She advocates for climate, energy, and environmental justice through her scientific and community work and strongly believes that Indigenous sciences can heal our Indigenous lands. Jessica is the author of the newly published Fresh Banana Leaves: Healing Indigenous Landscapes...
Published 04/12/22
“One of the most powerful untapped resources is spirituality. Spirituality—particularly spirituality from Black and Indigenous communities all over the world—has been so denigrated and so viciously attacked that many people are unaware of its transformative potential.” This is a replay of our past interview with Chelsea Mikael Frazier, Ph.D., a Black Feminist eco-critic who writes, researches and teaches at the intersection of Black feminist theory and environmental thought. (The musical...
Published 04/05/22
“We’ve collapsed the idea of community with 'connectivity'. But being 'connected' doesn’t mean you have any sense of community. To have a community, you need something very visceral, you need to be in close proximity with people, to communicate on a day-to-day basis, to understand the flaws of people. It’s not about curated existences.” In this episode, we welcome Brad Evans, a political philosopher, critical theorist, and writer, who specializes in the problem of violence. His work is...
Published 03/29/22
"Why is it important to focus on regular people, people in the in-between, people who bear some cost but also reap some profit? Because it gives us an insight into most people’s lives. As long as we don’t understand how we become acquiescent, not much will change." In this episode, we welcome Amalia Leguizamón, Associate Professor of Sociology and core faculty at the Stone Center for Latin American Studies at Tulane University. Her research examines the political economy of the environment...
Published 03/22/22
“This is what I call the agrobiopolitical paradox at the center of the modern agricultural state: Paraguay trying to push hard to get more soybeans out there and on the other hand trying to create institutions to protect people from all the soybeans that the left hand is putting in place.” In this episode, we welcome Kregg Hetherington, Ph.D., who is a political anthropologist specializing in the environment, infrastructure, and the bureaucratic state. He is the author of The Government of...
Published 03/15/22
"That neoliberal, technocratic environmentalism is also what we would call depoliticizing... it avoids the more transformative types of policies or solutions that extend outside of the policy realm and are necessary for confronting the climate crisis as we recognize it today." In this episode, we welcome Kai Bosworth, a geographer, political ecologist, and Assistant Professor at the School of World Studies, Virginia Commonwealth University. He is the author of Pipeline Populism: Grassroots...
Published 03/08/22
Emma Dowling IS a sociologist at the University of Vienna in Austria. She has previously held academic positions in Britain and Germany, and her most recent work asks what our economy looks like when viewed from the perspective of care, charting the material conditions that shape its configurations. Emma is the author of The Care Crisis - What Caused It and How Can We End It? published with Verso Books. Support our community-powered show to continue: GreenDreamer.com/support (The musical...
Published 03/01/22
Bram Ebus has worked on resource conflicts, drug policies, and state-corporate crimes in Latin America since 2010. He holds a master's degree from the University of Utrecht in Global Criminology with a focus on environmental and state-corporate crimes. In recent years, Bram has been active as an NGO consultant and investigative journalist, publishing for a variety of international media, and worked as the lead journalist for an award-winning interactive media production on mining conflicts...
Published 02/22/22
Scott Timcke, Ph.D., is a comparative historical sociologist who studies race, class, and technology in modernity. He is a research associate with the University of Johannesburg’s Centre for Social Change and a fellow at the University of Leeds’ Centre for African Studies where he studies the overlap between algorithmic capitalism, FinTech, and neocolonialism. He is also the author of Algorithms and The End of Politics. The song featured in this episode is Debt by Luna Bec. Green Dreamer is a...
Published 02/15/22
Dr. Beatriz Caiuby Labate (Bia Labate) has her core interests in the study of psychoactive substances, drug policies, shamanism, ritual, and religion. She is the author, co-author, and co-editor of seventeen books, one journal special edition, and several peer-reviewed articles. She is also the Executive Director of the Chacruna Institute for Psychedelic Plant Medicines. The song featured in this episode is Magic Hits by Adrian Sutherland. The episode artwork is by Danii Pollehn. Green...
Published 02/08/22
In this episode, we revisit our past conversation with Harriet Washington, an award-winning medical writer and editor and the author of the best-selling book Medical Apartheid: The Dark History of Medical Experimentation on Black Americans from Colonial Times to the Present. She's also the author of A Terrible Thing to Waste: Environmental Racism and its Assault on the American Mind. In her work, Harriet focuses mainly on bioethics, the history of medicine, African-American health issues,...
Published 02/01/22
What does it mean to understand our roles not as Earthlings but as “Placelings”? And as we deepen into the work of collective healing, what underlies the invitation to reframe the preservation of "wildness” into a re-establishment of “kinship”? John Hausdoerffer, Ph.D., is an author and teacher from Crested Butte, Colorado, where he serves as the Dean of the Clark School of Environment & Sustainability at Western Colorado University. John is the editor of What Kind of Ancestor Do You Want...
Published 01/25/22
How might we re-envision “international collaboration” beyond the political framework of nation-state institutions? And what could it mean to work more strategically in socio-ecological activism, targeting the choke points and the arteries of global trade and extractivism? In this episode, we welcome Liam Campling, a Professor of International Business & Development at the Queen Mary University of London, and Alejandro Colás, a Professor of International Relations, Birkbeck, at the...
Published 01/18/22
What does it mean to queer resilience in the face of climate catastrophes? And how might the dominant modes of disaster relief reinforce the centralized systems predicated on extraction and exploitation? In this episode, we welcome Vanessa Raditz, a queer biocultural geographer, educator, and storyteller dedicated to community healing, opening access to land and resources, and fostering a thriving local economy based on ecological resilience. They are a chronic academic, a current PhD...
Published 01/11/22
What might it mean for humanity to reach a level of maturation to be able to confront the multilayered crises we now face—calling upon us to “grow up and show up” for ourselves and our planet? And how might recognizing the broader contexts that each of our generations were raised in help us to have more empathy when navigating our differences? Vanessa de Oliveira Andreotti is a Brazilian educator and Indigenous and Land Rights advocate. She is a professor and Canada Research Chair in Race,...
Published 01/04/22
What would change if we viewed money as sacred, as a potential form of medicine? And how do the incentives embedded within the world of philanthropy act as barriers for it to catalyze deep transformations? In this episode, we welcome Edgar Villanueva, a globally recognized author, activist, and expert on social justice philanthropy. Edgar is the author of the bestselling book Decolonizing Wealth and the founder and principal of Decolonizing Wealth Project and Liberated Capital. The song...
Published 12/14/21
If the popularized vision of the Green New Deal were to be realized, how might that play out? And how do we contextualize the historical process of creating nation-states deemed as “underdeveloped”, “developing”, or “developed”? In this episode, we welcome Max Ajl, Ph.D, the author of A People's Green New Deal. Ajl is based at Wageningen University's Rural Sociology Group, and he is an associated researcher with the Tunisian Observatory for Food Sovereignty and the Environment. Ajl's...
Published 12/07/21
What have been the shortcomings of the various technologies promising to make mental health care more accessible? And what does it mean to maintain a sense of humanity in our systems of care—in a world where therapeutic support of different forms is increasingly digitized? In this episode, we welcome Emma Bedor Hiland, Ph.D., the author of Therapy Tech: The Digital Transformation of Mental Healthcare. As a feminist scholar, she brings an intersectional approach to analyses of the social and...
Published 11/30/21
What does it mean for those working within academia to become scholar-activists—going beyond working to rise within the ranks of educational institutions to engage with and help enact change within their communities? And why is maintaining an internationalist lens critical for those wanting to support Indigenous rights, sovereignty, and liberation? In this episode, we welcome Melanie Yazzie Ph.D., a citizen of the Navajo Nation. She is Assistant Professor of Native American Studies and...
Published 11/23/21
How do we make sense of the contradiction of having both excess food and food insecurity at the same time? And how do counterculture movements like Food Not Bombs prefigure the alternative worlds that are possible? In this episode, we welcome David Boarder Giles, the author of A Mass Conspiracy to Feed People: Food Not Bombs and the World-Class Waste of Global Cities, and an anthropologist of food, waste, cities, and social movements who teaches at Deakin University in Melbourne. He focuses...
Published 11/16/21