Episodes
What might it mean for humanity to reach a level of maturation to be able to confront the multilayered crises we now face—calling upon us to “grow up and show up” for ourselves and our planet? And how might recognizing the broader contexts that each of our generations were raised in help us to have more empathy when navigating our differences? Vanessa de Oliveira Andreotti is a Brazilian educator and Indigenous and Land Rights advocate. She is a professor and Canada Research Chair in Race,...
Published 01/04/22
What would change if we viewed money as sacred, as a potential form of medicine? And how do the incentives embedded within the world of philanthropy act as barriers for it to catalyze deep transformations? In this episode, we welcome Edgar Villanueva, a globally recognized author, activist, and expert on social justice philanthropy. Edgar is the author of the bestselling book Decolonizing Wealth and the founder and principal of Decolonizing Wealth Project and Liberated Capital. The song...
Published 12/14/21
If the popularized vision of the Green New Deal were to be realized, how might that play out? And how do we contextualize the historical process of creating nation-states deemed as “underdeveloped”, “developing”, or “developed”? In this episode, we welcome Max Ajl, Ph.D, the author of A People's Green New Deal. Ajl is based at Wageningen University's Rural Sociology Group, and he is an associated researcher with the Tunisian Observatory for Food Sovereignty and the Environment. Ajl's...
Published 12/07/21
What have been the shortcomings of the various technologies promising to make mental health care more accessible? And what does it mean to maintain a sense of humanity in our systems of care—in a world where therapeutic support of different forms is increasingly digitized? In this episode, we welcome Emma Bedor Hiland, Ph.D., the author of Therapy Tech: The Digital Transformation of Mental Healthcare. As a feminist scholar, she brings an intersectional approach to analyses of the social and...
Published 11/30/21
What does it mean for those working within academia to become scholar-activists—going beyond working to rise within the ranks of educational institutions to engage with and help enact change within their communities? And why is maintaining an internationalist lens critical for those wanting to support Indigenous rights, sovereignty, and liberation? In this episode, we welcome Melanie Yazzie Ph.D., a citizen of the Navajo Nation. She is Assistant Professor of Native American Studies and...
Published 11/23/21
How do we make sense of the contradiction of having both excess food and food insecurity at the same time? And how do counterculture movements like Food Not Bombs prefigure the alternative worlds that are possible? In this episode, we welcome David Boarder Giles, the author of A Mass Conspiracy to Feed People: Food Not Bombs and the World-Class Waste of Global Cities, and an anthropologist of food, waste, cities, and social movements who teaches at Deakin University in Melbourne. He focuses...
Published 11/16/21
How has philanthropy traditionally worked to uphold the extractive economic system? And what does it mean to recognize the various forms of capital that we have beyond financial capital? In this episode, we welcome Konda Mason, a social entrepreneur, Earth and social justice activist, spiritual teacher, and the president of Jubilee Justice, a nonprofit working to bring economic equity to BIPOC farmers and ecological sustainability by introducing an innovative way of growing rice while...
Published 11/09/21
How does viewing the Earth as an embodiment of imagination invite us to conceptualize or feel our ecological crises in different ways? And what does it mean to be more imaginative with our scientific inquiries—while also remaining a humility to recognize the limitations of this particular lens? In this episode, we welcome Monica Gagliano, the author of Thus Spoke the Plant and a Research Associate Professor in evolutionary ecology at Southern Cross University, where she directs the...
Published 11/02/21
How have the wellness and beauty industries thrived off of a dominant culture of non-acceptance? And what might be the healing potentials that lie in plant medicines—when their sacred origins and rituals are honored and respected? In this episode, we welcome Fariha Róisín. As a multidisciplinary artist who is a Muslim queer Bangladeshi, she is interested in the margins, in liminality, otherness, and the mercurial nature of being. Róisín is the author of the poetry collection How To Cure A...
Published 10/27/21
What does it mean to "see" soil beyond their chemistry and biology—understanding also their cultural, relational, and historical embodiment? How have Colombian small and Indigenous farmers resisted—and thrived—even amidst decades of armed conflicts, scientific colonization, and epistemological and ontological violences? In this episode, we welcome Dr. Kristina Lyons, an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania, whose current research is situated at the interfaces...
Published 10/19/21
In this episode, we welcome Nick Estes, a member of the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe and co-founder of The Red Nation. Nick is a historian, journalist, and author of Our History Is the Future: Standing Rock Versus the Dakota Access Pipeline, and the Long Tradition of Indigenous Resistance. Together, we unravel the topics of why truth-seeking to better understand history has become so politicized and contentious, the boarding school system that the U.S. used to assimilate Native children, The Red...
Published 10/12/21
In this episode, we revisit our past conversation with Charles Eisenstein, a public speaker and author of the books Climate — A New Story, The More Beautiful World Our Hearts Know is Possible, The Ascent of Humanity, and Sacred Economics. Charles‘ work covers a wide range of topics, including the history of human civilization, economics, spirituality, and the ecology movement. And some primary themes that he explores include anti-consumerism, interdependence, and how myth and narrative...
Published 10/05/21
How might we lean into appreciative inquiry in support of a cycle of healing? And what does it mean to view conflicts as potentials for collective breakthroughs? In this episode, we welcome Shilpa Jain, the Executive Director of YES! and a facilitator, author, and educator on topics including globalization, creative expressions, ecology, democratic living, innovative learning, and unlearning. The musical offering in this episode is Grandmother’s Song by Hand Drum Songs, provided to us by...
Published 09/28/21
What signs are there that the dominant culture has trended towards one of “choice paralysis”, with many stuck in “infinite browsing mode”? And how might encouraging people to commit—to causes, place, people, projects—support the societal transformation many deeply yearn for? In this episode, we welcome Pete Davis, a writer and civic advocate from Falls Church, Virginia. Pete works on civic projects aimed at deepening American democracy and solidarity, and he is the co-founder of Getaway and...
Published 09/22/21
What are the differences between “food security”, “food justice”, and “food sovereignty”? And while food aid and soup kitchens play a critical role in the immediate term, how might they still help to uphold the same power dynamics that historically marginalized communities wish to compost? In this episode, we welcome Karen Washington, a farmer and activist, to Green Dreamer. Karen is a co-owner/farmer at Rise & Root Farm in Chester, New York, and in 2010, she co-founded Black Urban...
Published 09/14/21
How does viewing people as “contextual beings” help us to realize the systemic changes that need to be made? What does it mean to have spiritual and political praxis—to see the shortcomings of New-Age spirituality when practiced in silos? In this episode, we welcome Alnoor Ladha, the co-founder and Executive Director of The Rules and a board member of Culture Hack Labs, a co-operatively run advisory for social movements and progressive organizations. Alnoor comes from a Sufi lineage and...
Published 09/07/21
What does it mean to see the inflammation of our bodies and Earth as interconnected and as signals of what is wrong outside? How did the major philanthropies shape the field of modern medicine to privilege or devalue certain forms of knowledge? In this episode, we're joined by Dr. Rupa Marya and Raj Patel, co-authors of Inflamed: Deep Medicine and the Anatomy of Injustice. Dr. Rupa Marya is a physician, an activist, a mother, and a composer. She is an associate professor of medicine at the...
Published 08/31/21
What is it that drives our individualistic pursuits for ethical purity? How do we embrace complicity as the starting point and begin to take responsibility for our messy histories? In this episode, we're joined by Dr. Alexis Shotwell, whose work focuses on complexity, complicity, and collective transformation. A professor at Carleton University, on unceded Algonquin land, she is the co-investigator for the AIDS Activist History Project and the author of Knowing Otherwise: Race, Gender, and...
Published 08/24/21
If material, economic growth is merely an illusion within a closed-loop system, what does it mean to re-orient towards the growth of intimacy, depth, complexity, and diversity? What does "Indigenous thinking" mean, if not some monolithic, prescriptive way of seeing the world? In this episode, we welcome Dr. Tyson Yunkaporta, an academic, an arts critic, and a researcher who is a member of the Apalech Clan in far north Queensland. He carves traditional tools and weapons and also works as a...
Published 08/17/21
How might we think and act differently if we recognized ourselves in our “Long Body”—seeing our continually transforming identities beyond our physical bodies into the past and the future? In the midst of an increasing loneliness epidemic, where so many feel disoriented, disassociated, and uprooted, how do we begin to regain a deep sense of belonging to dwell in place? In this episode, we're joined by Dr. Leny Mendoza Strobel, a Kapampangan from Central Luzon in the Philippines, who is...
Published 08/10/21
How might "eco-" or "ethical" certifications fall short of our hopes or expectations for what they mean and guarantee? What is it that leads many socially-driven food startups to become co-opted? In this episode, we welcome Errol Schweizer. Born in The Bronx, New York, Errol has over 25 years of experience in the food industry—from grill cook, stock clerk, and purchasing manager, to V.P. of Grocery, a position he held at Whole Foods for seven years. He has developed plant-based, Organic,...
Published 08/03/21
Why are the major social binaries inadequate in explaining the basis of our varied injustices? What is needed to translate our relational shifts from domination to partnerism into structural shifts in our societal configuration? In this episode, we welcome Dr. Riane Eisler, a systems scientist, futurist, attorney, and macro-historian whose research, writing, and speaking have transformed the lives of people worldwide. She is president of the Center for Partnership Systems (CPS),...
Published 07/27/21
What does it mean that we have a crisis in form—that our problems go deeper than the visible systems we often attribute them to? What might we gain from surrendering human control and centrality, slowing down even as we feel increasing urgency to address social injustice and climate change? In this episode, we're joined by Dr. Bayo Akomolafe. Rooted with the Yoruba people in a more-than-human world, Bayo is the father to Alethea and Kyah, the grateful life-partner to Ije, son and brother. A...
Published 07/20/21
What is connection phenomenology? How does our dominant society privilege certain ways of knowing and knowledge over others? How should we rethink security, and re-orientate it, away from disconnection, towards building greater communal relationships? How does a lack of a “felt” sense of safety affect and undergird our communities and system? How do we heal, in a historical context of colonization? Gabriel Kram is a connection phenomenologist, the Convener of the Restorative Practices...
Published 07/13/21
Why is it critical to, and how do we, contextualize our current water conflicts and issues around scarcity with colonial history? How has modern water architecture changed the way we think about water? What are some success stories of resilience from communities pushing back against those attempting to monopolize control over water? Karen Piper is the author of Cartographic Fictions, Left in the Dust, The Price of Thirst, and a memoir called A Girl's Guide to Missiles. Her interests are...
Published 07/06/21