Episodes
Liv reads Book II, (part 1) of The Argonautika by Apollonios, translated by RC Seaton. Having left Heracles and Hylas behind, the Argo continues on its voyage, encountering the famous boxer Amycus and a very unfortunate prophet. This is not a standard narrative story episode, it's simply a bonus reading of Homer. For regular episodes look for any that don't have "Liv Reads..." in the title! For a list of Roman/Latin names and who they were in the Greek, visit:...
Published 05/14/21
So many origins! Where did Laomedon of Troy's fancy horses come from, and why do they matter? And what about Heracles' familial origins?! CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing. Sources: Theoi.com; Apollodorus' Library of Greek Mythology translated by Robin Hard; The Greek Myths by Robert Graves; Early Greek Myths by Timothy Gantz. Attributions and...
Published 05/11/21
The ruins of Pompeii are famous for graffiti and the brothel, the Lupenar. Author Elodie Harper joins Liv to discuss her new novel The Wolf Den, imagining the stories of women living through life in the ancient CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing. The Wolf Den by Elodie Harper is available for preorder in the UK, with Blackwell Books shipping to...
Published 05/07/21
Hera is so much more than Zeus' vengeful wife. She has her own experiences, her own traumas, that affect how she handled her life with the king of the gods. This is why Hera is the way she is. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing. Sources: Theoi.com entries on Zeus, Hera, Poseidon, and Briareus; The Greek Myths by Robert Graves. Attributions and...
Published 05/04/21
Liv reads part three of Book I of Apollonios' Argonautika, translated by RC Seaton. The heroes of the Argo do a few odd "heroic" things before Herakles and Hylas encounter some trouble... This is not a standard narrative story episode, it's simply a bonus reading of a classical source. For regular episodes look for any that don't have "Liv Reads..." in the title! Attributions and licensing information for music used in the podcast can be found here: mythsbaby.com/sources-attributions.   See...
Published 04/30/21
Nikita Gill, poet and author of Great Goddesses, amongst many other incredible books and poetry collections, speak with Liv about reimagining goddesses and monsters of Greek mythology, about Medusa, misogyny, and colonialism, among other fascinating things. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing. Attributions and licensing information for music used...
Published 04/27/21
Ariadne is so much more than the Minotaur, the Labyrinth, Theseus, even Dionysus. Liv speaks with author Jennifer Saint about her new book retelling the stories of Ariadne and Phaedra. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing. Preorder Ariadne by Jennifer Saint wherever you get your books! Attributions and licensing information for music used in the...
Published 04/23/21
The story of the Titans, the first race of gods in Greek mythology, and the war between those Titans and the new race of gods, the Olympians. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing. Sources: Hesiod's Theogony, translations by Hugh Evelyn-White and Richard Lattimore; Apollodorus' Library of Greek Mythology, translated by Robin Hard; various...
Published 04/20/21
In a new series of trailers, LTAMB is highlighting other shows from small, independent groups or people that are doing good things and that you might be interested in. This is a trailer for the Ozymandias Project Podcast: find them on Apple and Spotify or wherever you're listening to this.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Published 04/19/21
In this bonus episode Liv and Dr. Kira Jones (@FlavianSophist) have a particularly free wheeling conversation about AC Odyssey's Kassandra: the wonder, the strength, the drama, the overall nerd-ery. They talk historical intricacies of the game, the history behind its creation, the diversity. Plus an anecdote about the very real Alcibiades and Herms. Attributions and licensing information for music used in the podcast can be found here: mythsbaby.com/sources-attributions.   See...
Published 04/17/21
Liv reads part two of Book I of Apollonios' Argonautika, translated by RC Seaton. The heroes of the Argo set sail before landing on the island of Lemnos where Jason meets Hypsipyle and the Lemnian women. This is not a standard narrative story episode, it's simply a bonus reading of a classical source. For regular episodes look for any that don't have "Liv Reads..." in the title! Attributions and licensing information for music used in the podcast can be found here:...
Published 04/16/21
Gaia/Ge is Mother Earth, the first goddess, the mother of the gods and Titans. She's also a near universal mythological being: the Mother Goddess. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing. Sources: Hesiod's Theogony, Homeric Hymns, and primary sources found under Gaia on Theoi.com. Attributions and licensing information for music used in the podcast...
Published 04/13/21
Liv reads part one of Book I of Apollonios' Argonautika, translated by RC Seaton. The heroes of the Argo assemble and plan to set sail in quest of the Golden Fleece. This is not a standard narrative story episode, it's simply a bonus reading of a classical source. For regular episodes look for any that don't have "Liv Reads..." in the title! Attributions and licensing information for music used in the podcast can be found here: mythsbaby.com/sources-attributions.   See acast.com/privacy for...
Published 04/09/21
Penthesilea was one of the most badass Amazons... Until she encountered Achilles. This story is not kind to he of the weak ankle. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing. Sources: Amazons by Adrienne Mayor; Quintus Smyrnaeus' The Fall of Troy translated by A.S. Way; Theoi.com. Attributions and licensing information for music used in the podcast can...
Published 04/06/21
This is a re-airing of reading of the Homeric Hymn to Hermes. This Homeric Hymn tells the story of the birth of Hermes and all the adventures he had as a newborn baby (they were plentiful). It's sometimes attributed to Homer, but comes from a similar time period in any case. This translation is by Hugh Evelyn-White and is in the Public Domain. Attributions and licensing information for music used in the podcast can be found here: mythsbaby.com/sources-attributions.   See acast.com/privacy...
Published 04/02/21
Ever heard the one about kind Theseus, his herd of Pegasi, the Kraken, and the ancient island of Santorini? Sources: My imagination. None of this is true. Attributions and licensing information for music used in the podcast can be found here: mythsbaby.com/sources-attributions.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Published 04/01/21
The incredible women of the Amazons exist in myth and history, even if their myths tend to revolve around certain Greek heroes. Otrera, Hippolyta, Antiope, Penthesilea... CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing. Sources: The Amazons by Adrienne Mayor; Homer's Iliad, translated by Caroline Alexander, another translated by Richard Lattimore; Theoi.com...
Published 03/30/21
Enjoy this bonus trailer for the audiobook version of Liv's forthcoming book Greek Mythology: The Gods, Goddesses, and Heroes Handbook, read by Liv herself and available wherever you get your audiobooks! linktr.ee/livalbert Attributions and licensing information for music used in the podcast can be found here: mythsbaby.com/sources-attributions.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Published 03/27/21
Persephone and real women of antiquity. Dr Ellie Mackin Roberts, author of Heroines of Olympus, talks about the versions of Persephone, real women's interactions with her, and understanding the idea of "abduction" in Greek mythology. Follow Ellie on TikTok and Twitter. CW/TW: **This episode contains more discussion of assault than usual, and in the context of historical women of ancient Greece; the references begin after the ad break** Attributions and licensing information for music used in...
Published 03/26/21
Phaedra is one of the most misunderstood women of mythology, and Greek tragedy. But she was so much more than the problematic, tragic Phaedra of Euripides' Hippolytus. The episode tells her story, and includes a conversation with author Jennifer Saint, who's new book Ariadne is available for pre-order! CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real...
Published 03/23/21
Liv speaks with the illustrator of her upcoming book of Greek mythology. Preorder links here. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing. Attributions and licensing information for music used in the podcast can be found here: mythsbaby.com/sources-attributions.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Published 03/20/21
In a bit of a departure from other Conversations episodes, Dr. Rad and Dr. G of the Partial Historians Podcast give Liv a history lesson, with a rundown on the life of Cleopatra VII, the last Pharaoh of Egypt. Subscribe to the Partial Historians podcast here. Attributions and licensing information for music used in the podcast can be found here: mythsbaby.com/sources-attributions.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Published 03/19/21
The life of Jocasta after the tragedy of her marriage to Oedipus continues with more tragedy in the city of Thebes. CW/TW: death by suicide; and far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing. Sources: Euripides' The Phoenician Women, two translations used: Elizabeth Wickoff and Cecelia Luschnig (quotes from Luschnig); Pandora's Jar by Natalie Haynes. Attributions...
Published 03/16/21
Liv is back speaking with author of the Medusa novella, Here, the World Entire, Anwen Kya Hayward all about the intricacies and nuances of Medea (Jason and Theseus are dragged, of course). CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing. Works Referred: Euripides' Medea, Ovid's Heroides (quotes from Harold Isbell translation), Seneca's Medea, and...
Published 03/12/21
Oedipus, and by extension Jocasta's story is known primarily via Sophocles' Oedipus Tyrannos, but Euripides's Phoenician Women has a much more satisfying story for the queen of Thebes. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing. Sources: Two translations of Euripides' The Phoenician Women, one translated by Elizabeth Wickoff the other by Cecelia...
Published 03/09/21