Episodes
Bruce Robison recorded this Aquacast at the Aquarium on August 13, 2013. Robison is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a fellow of the California Academy of Sciences.
Published 09/16/13
Published 09/16/13
Edith Widder recorded this Aquacast at the Aquarium on August 27, 2013. Widder is a deep-sea explorer, oceanographer, marine biologist, and co-founder of the Ocean Research and Conservation Association.
Published 08/27/13
Jim Hellemn recorded this Aquacast at the Aquarium on April 23, 2013. His photography has appeared in National Geographic magazine and at the American Museum of Natural History.
Published 08/05/13
Aquacast recorded on July 25, 2013. Jesus Reyes discusses the pressures on California’s coastal aquatic environments derived from highly developed urban and residential zones and their diverse, extensive activities.
Published 08/02/13
Aquacast recorded on June 19, 2013. Nicholas Fisher discusses the release of long-lived radionuclides from the Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan into the Pacific and the subsequent bioaccumulation of these contaminants in diverse marine biota.
Published 08/02/13
Aquacast recorded on June 25, 2013. Asila Ghoul discussed a recent study of the sensory systems of sea otters and how these amphibious animals are adapted for an aquatic lifestyle.
Published 08/02/13
Aquacast recorded on June 13, 2013. Richard Ellis discussed the broadbill swordfish, whose scientific name Xiphias gladius means “gladiator.”
Published 08/02/13
Aquacast recorded on May 14, 2013. Rapid coastal development, water and air pollution, overfishing, bycatch, and habitat loss have all contributed to declines in shark populations. Chris Lowe, of California State University, Long Beach's Shark Lab, discussed federal and state agencies and regulations and how they have helped sharks recover.
Published 08/02/13
Aquacast recorded at the Aquarium on May 7, 2013. After the earthquake and resulting tsunami that struck Japan in 2010, ocean currents and wind brought debris across the Pacific Ocean to the shores of the Pacific Northwest of the United States. Learn from Leslie Harris about the non-native plant and animal species attached to the debris that hitched a ride to our shores.
Published 08/02/13
Differences in diet among individuals of the same species is increasingly recognized as an important component of diversity in food webs.
Published 02/06/13
For twenty-eight years P. Dee Boersma, Ph.D., has studied the largest Magellanic Penguin colony in the world at Punta Tombo, Argentina.
Published 01/31/13
Dr. Maddalena Bearzi takes viewers inside the world of a marine mammal field scientist. She offers a firsthand understanding of cetacean behavior, as well as the frustrations, delights, and creativity involved in dolphin research.
Published 01/29/13
Painter, photographer, and naturalist J.J. L'Heureux shared her photographs and stories from her eleven years of annual expeditions to Antarctica during her lecture on March 20, 2012.
Published 08/01/12
Dr. Ellen Prager presented stories and images about the organisms that inhabit the oceans' depths and how they are connected to our food supply, the economy, jobs, and in biomedical research and biotechnology in her lecture on January 19, 2012.
Published 07/27/12
LuAnn Dahlman, who spoke at the Aquarium on September 22, 2011, spent a season at McMurdo Station in Antarctica, working with an international group of scientists and drillers who are doing this innovative research. Dahlman is part of the Communications and Education group at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Climate Program Office and develops climate-related educational materials.
Published 12/12/11
Craig Heberer, who spoke at the Aquarium on October 11, 2011, works as a fisheries biologist with National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries, Southwest Region, Sustainable Fisheries Division. He serves as the lead biologist for the Fishery Management Plan for U.S. West Coast Fisheries for Highly Migratory Species. Heberer was born and raised in San Pedro, California and grew up in the Croatian commercial tuna fishing industry.
Published 12/08/11
Joe Roman spoke at the Aquarium on September 28, 2011 about his research into the ecological role of whales in the ocean. He is a conservation biologist, freelance writer, and researcher at the University of Vermont. His research appears in the journals Science, BioScience, Trends in Ecology and Evolution, among others.
Published 12/08/11
Michele Westmorland, who spoke at the Aquarium on March 30, 2011, is a photojournalist with a twenty-year history of traveling the world documenting the marine life that inhabits the oceans. Her work has appeared in national and international publications, including National Geographic Traveler, Outside, Sport Diver, and Scuba Diving.
Published 10/03/11
Dr. James Lindholm, who spoke at the Aquarium on April 27, 2011, is the James W. Rote Distinguished Professor of Marine Science and Policy and the founder and director of the Institute for Applied Marine Ecology at California State University, Monterey Bay. His research interests include the landscape ecology of fishes, the recovery of seafloor habitats following the cessation of fishing activity, and the design and efficacy of marine protected areas.
Published 10/03/11
Dr. Milton Love, who spoke at the Aquarium on June 7, 2011, is a research biologist at the Marine Science Institute at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He has conducted research on the marine fishes of California for over forty years. He has been a recreational angler since 1955 and was briefly a commercial fisherman in Santa Barbara.
Published 09/19/11
Marc Shargel, who spoke at the Aquarium on June 28, 2011, has been diving along the California coast since 1978. He has been working as a professional marine life photographer for over twenty years. A longtime advocate for the adoption of marine reserves, Shargel served on the state's official advisory body, helping to select sites for marine protected areas along the southern central coast.
Published 09/19/11
Janna Shackeroff, who spoke at the Aquarium on July 13, 2011, is the international coordinator for the NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program, based in Silver Spring, Maryland. A Seal Beach native, she earned her Ph.D. in marine ecology and anthropology at Duke University in 2008, then began working for NOAA at a marine protected area in Hawaii. In 2010 the journal "Science" recognized Shackeroff as one of four emerging leaders in marine conservation.
Published 09/19/11
Juliet Eilperin, who spoke at the Aquarium about sharks on July 27, 2011, joined The Washington Post in 1998 as its House of Representatives reporter. Since 2004 she has served as the Post’s national environmental reporter, reporting on science, policy, and politics in areas including climate change, oceans, and air quality.
Published 09/19/11
David Helvarg is president of the Blue Frontier Campaign and the author of five books: The War Against the Greens, Blue Frontier, 50 Ways to Save the Ocean, Rescue Warriors, and Saved by the Sea. An award-winning journalist, he produced more than 40 broadcast documentaries for PBS, The Discovery Channel, and others.
Published 11/15/10