Episodes
An ancient solar storm helps pinpoint when Vikings lived in the Americas, and using magnets to deftly move non-magnetic metals.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Published 10/20/21
Hundreds of scientists have responded to a survey asking about harassment and abuse during the pandemic. The results paint a picture which is as concerning as it is shocking. In this episode of Coronapod we discuss the kinds of abuse scientists are facing, try to pick apart where it is comes from and ask what can be done about it? News Feature: ‘I hope you die’: how the COVID pandemic unleashed attacks on scientists Careers feature: Real-life stories of online harassment — and how...
Published 10/18/21
The neurons behind acupuncture’s effect on inflammation, and how antibiotics affect gut bacteria.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Published 10/13/21
New data suggests that inexpensive, high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters can effectively scrub SARS-CoV-2 particles from the air in hospital COVID wards. The result validates previous studies carried out in controlled conditions. Currently, HEPA filters are not routinely used in hospital settings, but researchers suggest they could could help mitigate the risk of tramission of airborne viruses. In addition a new study has demonstrated the effectiveness of mask wearing, with surgical...
Published 10/10/21
AI weather forecasters, mapping the human brain and the 2021 science Nobel prizes.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Published 10/06/21
Every year, thousands of scientists struggle to launch their own labs. For three years, a reporting team from Nature documented the lives of married couple Alison Twelvetrees and Daniel Bose as they worked to get their fledgling research groups off the ground. Frustrations over funding, a global pandemic, and a personal trauma have made this journey anything but simple for Ali and Dan. Listen to their story in Starting up in science. Starting up in science: behind the scenes In this bonus...
Published 09/29/21
Every year, thousands of scientists struggle to launch their own labs. For three years, a reporting team from Nature documented the lives of married couple Alison Twelvetrees and Daniel Bose as they worked to get their fledgling research groups off the ground. Frustrations over funding, a global pandemic, and a personal trauma have made this journey anything but simple for Ali and Dan. Listen to their story in Starting up in science. Episode 4 Ali interviews for a critical grant. While...
Published 09/29/21
Every year, thousands of scientists struggle to launch their own labs. For three years, a reporting team from Nature documented the lives of married couple Alison Twelvetrees and Daniel Bose as they worked to get their fledgling research groups off the ground. Frustrations over funding, a global pandemic, and a personal trauma have made this journey anything but simple for Ali and Dan. Listen to their story in Starting up in science. Episode 3 As newly-minted principal investigators,...
Published 09/29/21
Every year, thousands of scientists struggle to launch their own labs. For three years, a reporting team from Nature documented the lives of married couple Alison Twelvetrees and Daniel Bose as they worked to get their fledgling research groups off the ground. Frustrations over funding, a global pandemic, and a personal trauma have made this journey anything but simple for Ali and Dan. Listen to their story in Starting up in science. Episode 2 Ali and Dan have landed positions as the...
Published 09/29/21
Every year, thousands of scientists struggle to launch their own labs. For three years, a reporting team from Nature documented the lives of married couple Alison Twelvetrees and Daniel Bose as they worked to get their fledgling research groups off the ground. Episode 1 What does it take to start up in science? Meet two biologists fighting the odds to build their careers and break new ground. But their first priority is getting grants – without them, their labs might not stay afloat.   See...
Published 09/29/21
Australian scientists are developing new technologies to help protect coral from climate change.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Published 09/27/21
Less than 1% of those in low income countries are fully vaccinated, and that number only rises to 10% in low-middle income countries. Meanwhile more than half of the population in wealthier countries have received a double dose with several now rolling out third dosess. In this episode of Coronapod we look at the role of pharmaceutical manufacturers. Drug companies are facing increased pressure to partner with manufacturing firms in the global south but most are reluctant to relinquish...
Published 09/25/21
How tiny seed-like sensors could monitor the environment, and the latest from the Nature Briefing.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Published 09/22/21
How aquatic foods could help tackle world hunger, and how Australian wildfires spurred phytoplankton growth in the Southern Ocean.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Published 09/15/21
A new theory to explain missing geological time, the end of leaded petrol, and the ancient humans of Arabia.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Published 09/08/21
How insects help release carbon stored in forests, and the upcoming biodiversity summit COP 15.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Published 09/01/21
As women’s soccer, rugby and other sports gain in popularity a growing body of evidence suggests that female athletes are at a greater risk of traumatic brain injury than men - what's more they tend to fare worse after a concussion and take longer to recover. Now researchers are racing to get to the bottom of why and ask how treatment might need to change. This is an audio version of our feature: Why sports concussions are worse for women   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out...
Published 08/25/21
Delta has quickly become the dominant COVID variant in many countries across the world, in this episode we ask why. Over the past few weeks, a slew of studies have started to shed more light on how the Delta variant differs from its cousins and even the mechanisms behind its rampant spread. We dig into studies on the epidemiology and molecular biology of Delta to ask some key questions surrounding its transmissibility, lethality and what all this might mean for vaccine roll outs. News: The...
Published 08/21/21
A team is creating bespoke words for scientific terms in African languages, and the sustainability of the electric car boom. 24:06 Briefing chat We discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time, how a tusk-based ‘chemical GPS’ revealed details of a mammoth’s enormous journeys , and why the Perseverance rover’s first efforts to collect a Mars rock sample didn’t go according to plan. Nature: Mammoth’s epic travels preserved in tusk Nature: Why NASA’s Mars rover failed to...
Published 08/18/21
Several wealthy nations have announced plans to give third vaccine doses in a bid to help increase the protection of their most vulnerable citizens - but the science is not clear on whether this strategy will be effective or indeed necessary. Meanwhile with limited vaccine supplies - billions around the world still have no access to vaccines at all. In this episode of Coronapod we discuss the science of boosters, the stark reality of vaccine disparity and what this means for the future of the...
Published 08/14/21
Researchers uncover how grid cells fire in a 3D space to help bats navigate, and a fabric that switches between being stiff and flexible.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Published 08/11/21
Ivermectin is a cheap, widely available, anti-parasitic drug that has been proposed by many as a possible treatment for COVID-19. Dozens of trials have been started, but results have been far from clear, with inconsistent results further confused by high profile paper retractions. Nonetheless many countries have recommended the use of Ivermectin, despite WHO advice to the contrary. Now a group of researchers have found suspect data in another influential paper which claimed a Ivermectin...
Published 08/06/21
Satellite imaging has shown population increases are 10x higher in flood prone areas, and a new way to introduce fairness into a democratic process.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Published 08/04/21
Researchers debate whether an ancient fossil is the oldest animal yet discovered, and a new way to eavesdrop on glaciers.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Published 07/28/21
Archaeological evidence shows that ancient people ate bread, beer and other carbs, long before domesticated crops.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Published 07/26/21