Parliament Strikes Back in Britain
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In a battle over what kind of democracy would prevail in Britain, Prime Minister Boris Johnson seemed to have gained the upper hand by cutting Parliament out of Brexit. Until last week. Guest: Mark Landler. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: In Washington, scarcely a handful of Republicans have stood up to President Trump. In comparison, Prime Minister Boris Johnson has found lawmakers in his Conservative Party to be much more rebellious.Mr. Johnson has received messages of support from President Trump, and there are some obvious parallels in the rise of the two leaders. But the “bromance” between Mr. Johnson and Mr. Trump is more complex than it might seem.Mr. Johnson’s chief aide, Dominic Cummings, who appeared to revel in the feud with Parliament, has become a lightning rod for criticism of the government’s strategy.
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