Episodes
In 2016, the American Medical Association declared that gun violence in the U.S. is a public health crisis. Not just the mass shootings which make national headlines, but the daily violence that constitute the overwhelming majority of gun deaths- suicide, intimate partner violence, murder, police killings and even accidental shootings. The ripple effects impacts all of us, even if we are not directly experiencing the violence ourselves. It's compounding another national crisis, that of...
Published 05/26/22
Published 05/26/22
We learn more about Uvalde and the people who live there. We spoke with Texas state senator Roland Gutierrez, who represents Uvalde, about the devastating school shooting that took place at Robb Elementary on Tuesday, May 24. 
Published 05/25/22
On Tuesday, an 18 year old gunman shot and killed at least 21 people, including 19 children and 2 adults, at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas. Uvalde is a majority Latino-town slightly over an hour outside of San Antonio. The shooting is the deadliest to occur at an elementary school since the Sandy Hook shooting in 2012. We spoke to professor of sociology and psychiatry Jonathan Metzl to discuss the toll that school shootings take on the mental health of children nationwide.
Published 05/25/22
On Tuesday a gunman killed at least 19 children, 1 teacher, and at least 1 other adult in an elementary school in Uvalde, Texas. These precious children were killed while simply attending school are now among the thousands of young people injured or killed by guns during the past year. In fact, analysis of CDC data recently published by the New England Journal of Medicine reveals that in 2020 firearms became the leading cause of death for young Americans. In December, the U.S. Surgeon...
Published 05/25/22
Loneliness and social isolation are growing public health concerns among older Americans. Loneliness is not only detrimental to mental health, but also contributes to physical  health risks including strokes, worsened diabetes and frailty. We spoke with Dr. Carla Perissinotto about the causes of loneliness for older adults, what we get wrong about it, and what interventions can address the crisis of loneliness. We also hear from Wanda Dobson, a 69-year old woman in New York City and employee...
Published 05/24/22
A Strange Loop already won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 2020 following its off-Broadway run; now, the Broadway show is up for 11 Tony Awards–the most-nominated production of the year. We speak with playwright and composer Michael R. Jackson about his groundbreaking musical, which poignantly tackles themes of queerness, race, religion and AIDS with humor and heart. The original Broadway cast recording comes out June 10.     
Published 05/24/22
The critically acclaimed show Love on the Spectrum premiered on Netflix this month with its first U.S.-based season. The docu-reality series takes us inside the lives of autistic adults as they date and look for love. Director and showrunner Cian O’Clery and show participant Dani join us to talk about making the show and trying to find love in front of the camera.
Published 05/23/22
Social media and dating apps have fundamentally changed the culture of sex, and this impacts how young adults are shaping their personal relationships today. In her new book, The Current Collegiate Hookup Culture, online dating researcher Aditi Paul talks about the “new” culture of sex on college campuses.
Published 05/23/22
With the recent leaked draft opinion from the Supreme Court suggesting the court may overturn Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that legalized abortion, privacy experts are concerned about digital surveillance and digital privacy in a post-Roe world. Smartphone apps and internet search engines can track data and locations leaving a data footprint if someone is searching for reproductive healthcare or abortion care. We speak with Cynthia Conti-Cook, civil rights attorney and current Technology...
Published 05/23/22
As another class of Gen-Z graduates, they are taking one more step into adulthood. But still, our nation is divided by racial violence, economic inequality and disappearing reproductive rights. For this reason, The Takeaway takes a Deep Dive into Gen-Z: Who are they and what do they want? To give us a better idea we talked to Cathy Cohen, the David and Mary Winton Green Distinguished Service Professor of Political Science at the University of Chicago and Philip N. Cohen, Professor and...
Published 05/20/22
From the 1870s into the 1990s, the Canadian government and Catholic churches ran a vast network of boarding schools called "Indian residential schools," where Indigenous children were taken and forced to assimilate into white Canadian culture. Countless children suffered sexual, physical and psychological abuse in these institutions, and survivors and their families are wrestling with the repercussions to this day. Connie Walker, the host of the podcast Stolen: Surviving St. Michael’s, speaks...
Published 05/19/22
This weekend, rapper and poet Omar Offendum will be performing a show he wrote called “Little Syria” at the Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM). In it, Offendum uses music to tell the story of the Little Syria neighborhood of Manhattan, which flourished in the late 19th and early 20th century, before many of its residents were displaced by construction and left for Brooklyn. The Takeaway speaks with Offendum about how he approached telling this history on stage.  
Published 05/19/22
Valarie Kaur is a civil rights activist, author of "See No Stranger" and leader of the Revolutionary Love Project. She joined us to reflect on her work that addresses hate crimes against Muslim and Sikh Americans, and how it connects to the racist attacks from this past weekend in Buffalo.
Published 05/19/22
Last weekend’s racist attack at a Tops Supermarket in Buffalo has had significant ramifications for a part of Buffalo’s East Side, a neighborhood which has historically struggled with food insecurity. Tops is the lone supermarket in this part of Buffalo’s East Side, and it is now temporarily closed.  The attack highlights how the city’s legacy of institutionalized racism and segregation has given rise to food access and inequities in the communities affected.  In the aftermath,...
Published 05/18/22
In response to a number of mass shootings and incidents of gun violence across the country this past weekend, including the Buffalo massacre, some cities instituted curfews. Policymakers are also having their perennial conversation on gun control. The Takeaway speaks with Dr. Jonathan Metzl about the history and future of curfews and gun regulations in the U.S. 
Published 05/18/22
Natasha Warikoo, Professor of Sociology at Tufts University spent time in a privileged suburb on the East Coast doing research for her book “Race at The Top: Asian Americans and Whites in Pursuit of the American Dream in Suburban Schools.” In a majority white town she calls Woodcrest, the Asian population is growing, and the Asian students consistently out-perform the white students there. We speak with Natasha about the competition between white and Asian students at Woodcrest and in...
Published 05/18/22
This past weekend, a gunman who appears to have been motivated by white supremacy shot and killed ten people in Buffalo, New York, where he traveled to target the city’s Black community. The tragic shooting is one of several disturbing massacres motivated by hate that have occurred in recent years. But the history of race based violence dates back to the beginning of what is now the United States, and some of the recent racially motivated attacks call to mind the racist violence that...
Published 05/17/22
Reverend Jacqui Lewis is Senior Minister at Middle Collegiate Church. She is the author of Fierce Love: A Bold Path to Ferocious Courage and Rule-Breaking Kindness That Can Heal the World and the host of the “Love.Period.” Podcast. Reverend Jacqui Lewis a regular of the show and she always leaves our listeners with a timely message about the power of love and radical acceptance. We spoke with the Reverend Jacqui Lewis, Senior Minister at Middle Collegiate Church about how she's making sense...
Published 05/17/22
The shooting in Buffalo is being investigated as a hate crime, and given the gunman’s racist writings all indications are that he targeted the Black community.  We're joined by Jack McDevitt, Professor of the Practice in Criminology and Criminal Justice and Director of the Institute on Race and Justice at Northeastern University, to explore the connection between racism in America and hate crimes, and consider why explicit racism has declined over time, yet racist hate crimes have recently...
Published 05/17/22
In her new film, "Try Harder," Debbie Lum takes viewers through the reality of the American college application process and the intersections of race, class, educational opportunity and attainment.  The documentary focuses on students who attend Lowell High School in San Francisco California, a school known for academic excellence. Asians represent the majority of the student body, but all of the students at Lowell high school face intense pressure from their families and peers to get into...
Published 05/17/22
Since the 1970s white evangelicals have become increasingly powerful in American elections and increasingly influential in American policy making.   We explore the history, contemporary power, and likely future of white evangelicals in American politics with Anthea Butler, Geraldine R. Segal Professor in American Social Thought and Chair of Religious Studies at the University of Pennsylvania and author of White Evangelical Racism: The Politics of Morality in America, and Randall Balmer,...
Published 05/16/22
Comedian Matt Rogers is well known as co-host of the podcast “Las Culturistas” with Bowen Yang. On the show, Rogers and Yang dissect everything from the Real Housewives franchise to Taylor Swift to the Oscar frontrunners. The podcast has a devoted following, and this spring, Rogers is set to break out on screen in the Showtimes series, “I Love That for You,” and the Hulu movie, “Fire Island.” Rogers joins The Takeaway to talk about his new roles and weigh in on some of the pieces of pop...
Published 05/16/22
Recent results from a survey conducted by the Women Mayors Network indicates that nearly all mayors report experiences with threat and harassment. The problem is particularly acute for women and women of color mayors. We speak with Heidi Gerbracht, Founder and director of the Equity Agenda and Co-founder of the Women Mayors Network, about what this reveals about the health of our democracy.  
Published 05/13/22
This week, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) announced that they will be phasing visitations back in for people being held at their detention facilities. In-person visitations from family, friends, and advocates have been halted since the start of the pandemic based on Covid-19 concerns, according to ICE. Unlike ICE, the federal prison system allowed visitations to resume starting in October 2020. The move is a promising sign for people being held by ICE and their loves ones,...
Published 05/13/22