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What is Tragedy?
Tragedy has been around for over 2500 years, from its earliest manifestations in the huge open-air gathering-places of Athens and other Greek city-states, to the theatres of Renaissance England, Spain and France, right through to the twentieth century with its cinematic tragedies, and the disturbing works of Harold Pinter and Samuel Beckett. In four dialogues, Oliver Taplin, Emeritus Professor, and Joshua Billings, a graduate student in the Oxford Classics Faculty, ask and discuss what tragedy is, what tragedy does for people, whether tragedy teaches, and if tragedy is still alive today.
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Ratings & Reviews
4.5 stars from 28 ratings
In the second episode, the host mentions that he dislike the notion of purgation as interpretation of Aristotle’s catharsis. Instead, he thinks the metaphor of vaccination is better. Namely that a tragedy functions a small douce of undeserved misfortune which would be catastrophic in real life,...Read full review »
tarizan via Apple Podcasts · Great Britain · 10/21/20
Oxford
Riojas45
Riojas45 via Apple Podcasts · Spain · 05/13/11
أغاني
راشد الماجد
ابو £ فراس via Apple Podcasts · Saudi Arabia · 05/10/11
Recent Episodes
Discussion on whether tragedy still exists in modern culture, whether in films, modern theatre or and other creative arts. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/
Published 03/01/10
Published 03/01/10
Third dialogue on the nature of tragedy where they talk about whether tragic theatre teaches people, and if it does, how and what does it teach? Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/
Published 03/01/10
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