Episodes
In his new book, Mustn't Grumble: The Surprising Science of Everyday Ailments and Why We're Always a Bit Ill, award-winning science writer Graham Lawton covers over 100 ailments and explains the latest scientific thinking around everything from clicky ankles to twitchy eyelids. 
Published 10/09/21
West Aucklander Dawn O'Connor lives in Brussels, Belgium, where she has been based since 2018. She joins Jim for Calling Home.
Published 10/09/21
Anger management, rumours and roadmaps to nowhere; Pandora Papers highlight deals done in darkness; Anthonie Tonnon: singing the news.
Published 10/09/21
Simplicity KiwiSaver chief executive Sam Stubbs and investigative journalist Paula Penfold join us on the Weekend Panel. They discuss where to from now for Delta, making teachers get vaccinated, the slowness with antigen tests and how safe a country is New Zealand anymore?
Published 10/09/21
Denmark - home to about six million people - has lifted all its Covid-19 restrictions. Epidemiologist Lone Simonsen talks to Jim about how the situation is likely to play out in Denmark over the coming months.
Published 10/09/21
Lifewise Community Service Manager Peter Shimwell joins Jim to reflect on the plight of an increasing homeless population in Aotearoa. 
Published 10/09/21
There's a reading revolution happening in Aotearoa; a community initiative where people are coming together (albeit by Zoom right now) to read literature aloud and chat about whatever a story or poem evokes. It's called Reading Revolution, and it was started in New Zealand in 2015 by former librarian Kate Middleton. The project springs from an initiative in the UK called The Reader, which cites the benefits of shared reading for people including those with depression, dementia, addictions and...
Published 10/02/21
Don't be surprised if you witness -- or are victim to -- a magpie dive bombing someone in the coming weeks. (Thanks, Australia.) It's nesting season and the time-honoured tradition of magpies swooping down on unsuspecting human targets, particularly those riding bikes, has us ducking for cover once again. But what can be done to lessen the chances of being set upon by these intelligent black and white pests? Professor Yolanda van Heezik, a zoologist from the University of Otago, is with us to...
Published 10/02/21
How often have you picked up a bottle of milk and realised -- after a quick sniff test -- it's funkier than it should be? We've all been there. But you might want to think twice before discarding milk, or other products, just because the suggested best before date has elapsed. Indeed, there are plenty of different ways you can turn your expired milk into liquid gold. Cook book author and former Food in a Minute host Allyson Gofton looks at different ways to salvage foods that are nearing an...
Published 10/02/21
The Covid-19 lockdowns have seen a global shift in how we work, with millions adjusting to working from home. But what does that mean for our working habits? An international study from Microsoft suggests people are working longer, but not necessarily harder, while local research by AUT Professor of Human Resource Management, Jarrod Haar, suggests most people's workload has stayed about the same. However, some are working more than the expected eight hours, and others are milking the...
Published 10/02/21
When Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Evan Osnos was living away from the United States for a decade, he often found himself making a case for his home country, despite the grave mistakes it had made throughout history. But when he returned to the US, he found a divided nation that was driven by rage and fear. In his new book, Wildland: The Making of America's Fury, Osnos goes in search of an explanation. Travelling to three places in which he has lived: Greenwich, Connecticut; Chicago;...
Published 10/02/21
Tomorrow's the big day for Auckland, with the Government set to make an announcement on the region's alert level after six weeks of Level 4 and 3 lockdown for the City of Sails. The rest of the country is at Level 2. Epidemiologist Michael Baker says it'll be hard to shift Auckland down alert levels with the situation still not under control in New Zealand's biggest city. He joins the show for a Covid-19 update and a prediction of what we might hear from Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and the...
Published 10/02/21
It's drilled into many of us that to shift kilograms, you need to start pounding the pavement. However, a new study out of Australia reports you can lose a percentage of body fat through strength training alone that is similar to weight loss through cardio or aerobics. New Zealander Dr Mandy Hagstrom, an exercise physiologist and senior lecturer at UNSW Medicine & Health, is the senior author of the study, which was published in Sports Medicine. She's with us to explain the research and...
Published 10/02/21
This weekend Lavina Good and Chris Finlayson join Jim to discuss the New Zealanders trapped aboard as the MIQ booking system continues to thwart Kiwis trying to get home, vaccine passports - the Aotearoa/New Zealand debate, local councils' opposition to proposed Three Waters reform, and James Bond's smartphone.
Published 10/02/21
Dunedinite Professor Peter Croot has seen a fair bit of both land and sea during his time as an internationally-respected chemical oceanographer, having lived and worked in the USA, Sweden, Germany, the Netherlands and England before arriving in Galway in 2012. Along with traversing lots of different terra firma, Professor Croot has continued to explore the world's oceans since his early days as a PhD student at the University of Otago, where he remembers battling seasickness aboard the...
Published 10/02/21
It's been a big week for New Zealand TV director Jessica Hobbs following her breakthrough Emmy win for her work on The Crown. The London-based filmmaker was born into the industry, having joined her mum, director Aileen O'Sullivan, on set for a role in local mini-series The Governor as a child. After becoming an assistant director on films like Dame Jane Campion's An Angel at My Table, Hobbs went on to Australia, where she directed shows like Heartbreak High and The Slap, which got her...
Published 09/26/21
New York Times bestselling author Jessica Lahey is a mother, a teacher in a drug and alcohol centre for adolescents, and a recovering alcoholic with a strong family history of addiction. Jessica wanted to develop a better understanding of why she had become an alcoholic and yet her sister could drink without having a problem. And she wanted to know what she could do to ensure her own children didn't follow in her own footsteps. Her latest book, The Addiction Inoculation: Raising Kids in a...
Published 09/25/21
In her former life, Martinborough-based author Rosy Fenwicke was a doctor who wrote books on the side. She's been a fulltime writer for a year now and won't be going back anytime soon. Her latest book, Cold Wallet: Locked. Loaded. Gone., tells the story of Jess, a lonely young woman who marries the man of her dreams, Andrew, only to have him die tragically on their honeymoon at a resort in Fiji. And that's where things start getting interesting. Andrew, a cyber genius, leaves his former...
Published 09/25/21
Magic, luck, schools, Twitter, creativity, social skills, illusions, magician, David Copperfield, Houdini, chance, casino, gambling, addiction, lottery, anxiety, Internet, social media, Professor Richard Wiseman, intuition, emotion, confirmation bias, weather
Published 09/25/21
University of Otago epidemiologist and regular Sunday Morning guest Professor Michael Baker returns to the show to answer your Covid-19 questions and ours.
Published 09/25/21
Covid complications confuse the media; Collins' snubs startles media - but it cuts both ways; confused claims of Covid-compromised cancer care; Collins' snubs startles media - but it cuts both ways.
Published 09/25/21
Among other topics this morning, our Weekend panellists will be discussing the first morning of daylight saving, vaccine resistance and tolerance of the unvaccinated, controversy over James Shaw's overseas travel and ageism on social media.
Published 09/25/21
Lockdown has certainly had its disadvantages, but one of the few advantages has been the increase in free time many people have had. We know about what an increase in free time can do for our well-being. However, that only works to a point. New research published by the American Psychological Association shows that too much free time can also be a bad thing. Study co-author Hal Hershfield from the UCLA Anderson School of Management joins the show to look at the research, which was published...
Published 09/25/21
The results were overwhelming when Research New Zealand asked Kiwis about what we should be doing to manage Covid-19, with nearly three-quarters of people (70%) saying they support lockdowns to eliminate Covid-19. For many people, however, that willingness only extends to when the vaccination target has been reached. Half the respondents of Research NZ's latest survey said they supported the idea of restaurants and bars only serving vaccinated people, while only 7% want to return to life as...
Published 09/25/21
Wellington actor Thomasin Harcourt McKenzie has been described as "dazzlingly talented" in Vogue, and has worked alongside such movie stars as Benedict Cumberpatch, Scarlett Johansson and Kirsten Dunst, to name a few. She was predicted to dominate the screen in 2021, and with four major movies out this year -- including Edgar Wright's Last Night in Soho, which has just premiered at the Venice Film Festival -- those predictions have been on the mark. Indeed, IndieWire film critic Nicholas...
Published 09/19/21