Episodes
In this conversation recorded for Washington Post Live on Feb. 15, two-time WNBA champion A’ja Wilson discusses her new book, “Dear Black Girls: How to Be True to You,” as well as how her grandmother made her a dreamer, what brought her to basketball and why Black women and girls need to have “the talk” that’s associated with Black men and boys since the death of Trayvon Martin.”
Published 02/22/24
Published 02/22/24
In this conversation recorded for Washington Post Live on Feb. 14, Denver Mayor Mike Johnston talks about how the influx of migrants sent to his city has pushed it to “a breaking point,” what the impact of the bipartisan Senate immigration bill would have been and how former president Donald Trump is trying to keep the crisis going.
Published 02/15/24
Almost four months since Hamas’ barbaric attacks, Israel’s bloody operation in Gaza is still ongoing, with civilian casualties mounting by the day. The war has dominated our news feeds and dinner table conversations, and opened up rifts that cross traditional partisan lines. Three of our columnists — Jason Rezaian, Alyssa Rosenberg and Shadi Hamid — got together to discuss if the war is changing how they think about America, its moral standing in the world and what it means to be an...
Published 02/08/24
In this conversation recorded for Washington Post Live on Feb. 2, actor Aunjanue Ellis-Taylor digs into her new film “Origin," working with director Ava DuVernay, and how she prepared her portrayal of author Isabel Wilkerson writing the best-selling book, “Caste: The Origin of Our Discontents.” 
Published 02/02/24
In this conversation recorded for Washington Post Live on Jan. 19, Post columnist Michele L. Norris discusses her new book, “Our Hidden Conversations: What Americans Really Think About Race and Identity,” how she got people to open up about such a fraught topic, and the difference between “race” and “racism.”
Published 01/25/24
In this conversation recorded for Washington Post Live on Jan. 10, actor David Oyewolo talks about his new series, “Lawmen: Bass Reeves,” in which he plays the eponymous Bass Reeves, the first Black deputy U.S. marshal west of the Mississippi River. Oyelowo also discusses what it was like to work with his wife in a part weighted with personal and historic significance, and why it was important for him to bring Reeves’s story to the screen.
Published 01/18/24
In this conversation recorded for Washington Post Live on Jan. 11, Tennessee Rep. Justin J. Pearson discusses how the legacy of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. has impacted the rising generation of political leaders and why he thinks U.S. institutions are being degraded through partisan politics.
Published 01/11/24
In this conversation recorded for Washington Post Live on July 20, Colson Whitehead discusses his new book, “Crook Manifesto,” how the novel fits into the Harlem trilogy, his process of grounding critiques of how we live into his writing, and what genres he plans to conquer next.
Published 12/28/23
In this conversation recorded for Washington Post Live on June 22, two-time Academy Award-winning costume designer Ruth E. Carter discusses her new book, “The Art of Ruth E. Carter: Costuming Black History and the Afrofuture, from Do the Right Thing to Black Panther,” dives deep on her creative process, and reflects on how her work has helped define Black style and culture.
Published 12/21/23
In this conversation recorded for Washington Post Live on Dec. 14, Michelle Ebanks, the president and CEO of the Apollo Theater, discusses the history of the legendary performing arts venue in the heart of Harlem, the building’s first expansion and renovation – and how two decades of leadership at Essence Communications have positioned her to lead the Apollo into its next chapter.
Published 12/14/23
In this conversation recorded for Washington Post Live on Dec. 6, actor Adrienne Warren and creator & showrunner Marissa Jo Cerar discuss their new series, “Black Cake,” and dig into the intergenerational, intersectional story of a Black American family learning the truth about their mother after her death. Warren and Cerar also touch on the importance of showing stories of Black and Brown people that are not about the civil rights movements, slavery or oppression, and why the story could...
Published 12/07/23
In this conversation recorded for Washington Post Live on Nov. 29, actor Lily Gladstone and writer-director Erica Tremblay discuss their new film, “Fancy Dance,” the importance of setting the story on a Seneca-Cayuga reservation, the themes of indifference and invisibility, and why, despite its great acclaim and reviews, no studio has bought the film.
Published 11/30/23
In this conversation first recorded for Washington Post Live on April 27, Yale University professor Ned Blackhawk discusses his book, “The Rediscovery of America: Natives Peoples and the Unmaking of U.S. History,” which recently won the National Book Award for nonfiction, and explores the foundational role Native Americans have played in U.S. history, including in the formulation of our country’s Constitution, and how their presence and contributions are frequently overlooked, or worse, erased.
Published 11/23/23
Forty years ago, the body of a prime minister went missing. The Post’s Martine Powers asks: Who’s responsible?
Published 11/19/23
In these Washington Post Live conversations from Nov. 14, former Israeli foreign minister Tzipi Livni and award-winning Palestinian journalist Rula Jebreal discuss the Israel-Gaza war from their respective vantages, plus the next steps for the conflict.
Published 11/14/23
In this Washington Post Live conversation from Nov. 8, Rob Rubba — winner of the 2023 James Beard Award for outstanding chef — discusses his Michelin-starred restaurant Oyster Oyster, why he sees it as a “stepping-stone” for restaurants of the future and how sustainability is worked into everything from the food in the kitchen to the plate on the table.
Published 11/09/23
In this Washington Post Live conversation from Oct. 31, Rep. Daniel S. Goldman (D-N.Y.) discusses how he and his family sheltered in a Tel Aviv hotel during Hamas’s terrorist attack on Israel, his support for Israel’s right to defend itself and his thoughts on new House Speaker Mike Johnson.
Published 11/03/23
In this Washington Post Live conversation from Oct. 16, actress and author Jada Pinkett Smith discusses her new memoir, “Worthy,” growing up in Baltimore, her misunderstood relationship with Tupac Shakur, and corrects the record about her marriage with Will Smith.
Published 10/19/23
In this Washington Post Live conversation from Oct. 4, filmmaker Raoul Peck discusses his new documentary, “Silver Dollar Road,” which explores the history of land dispossession of Black homeowners through the story of the Reels family, and explains what drew him to their fight to save their home.
Published 10/12/23
In this Washington Post Live conversation from Sept. 20, Drew Gilpin Faust, a historian and the first female president of Harvard University, discusses her new book, “Necessary Trouble: Growing Up Midcentury,” which chronicles her path toward civil rights activism, and puts her scholarship on the Civil War into greater context.
Published 10/05/23
In this Washington Post Live conversation from Sept. 18, USAID administrator Samantha Power discusses the ways women are leading the charge in combating our changing climate, why they are disproportionately impacted, and USAID’s efforts to help communities mitigate and adapt to the climate change.
Published 09/28/23
In this conversation recorded for Washington Post Live on Sept. 6, Post columnist Michele Norris discusses her new podcast, “Your Mama’s Kitchen,” where she talks with guests about the importance of their mom’s kitchen in the life of their home and family, and how childhood food memories shape us.
Published 09/14/23
In this conversation recorded for Washington Post Live on Feb. 8, former Newsweek editor Mark Whitaker discusses his new book, “Saying It Loud: 1966 – The Year Black Power Challenged the Civil Rights Movement,” how the year transformed the way in which Black Americans viewed their lives and lessons for activists organizing today.
Published 09/07/23
In this Washington Post Live conversation from May 10, Chasten Buttigieg discusses the new edition of his memoir, “I Have Something to Tell You,” which he rewrote for young adults, why he thinks the far right is going after LGBTQ Americans and what he hopes for his two children when they are old enough to read his book.
Published 08/31/23