Episodes
Aerosols can move around the globe - affecting our climate and our weather but how do they affect human health? Kim Prather, PhD explores how her work transfers the complexity of the ocean's atmosphere into the lab to better understand the COVID-19 pandemic. [Health and Medicine] [Science] [Show ID: 36060]
Published 06/18/20
Human health is affected by environmental change. Those impacts are distributed unequally within and between populations and the disparity between those most responsible and those most affected by change. Dr. Thomas Newman describes how you can reduce your own environmental footprint by conserving energy, reducing travel, eating less meat, and offsetting carbon. But individual change alone will not be enough as greater change is necessary. Newman is Professor Emeritus of Epidemiology &...
Published 05/28/20
Throughout the US and around the world, extreme heat is on the rise. Its a trend that many of us have perceived even in our own lifetimes we talk about how heat waves have gotten hotter, less bearable. Kristina Dahl, PhD Senior Climate Scientist, Union of Concerned Scientists, explains that extreme heat already presents serious dangers to our health and livelihoods. She looks at data and talks about the future. Series: "Mini Medical School for the Public" [Health and Medicine] [Science] [Show...
Published 05/27/20
With a rapid shift of policy attention to the virus and economic recovery, how will the energy system change? And what will happen to climate emissions and policy? Speakers: Michael Davidson and David Victor Series: "Global Impacts of COVID-19 - A GPS Webinar Series" [Public Affairs] [Show ID: 35871]
Published 05/18/20
This webinar focuses on what transportation solutions are available to combat these trying times. Panelists discuss what strategies states, cities, transit agencies, TNCs and others are taking to address COVID-19. The session begins by introducing some insights into suspected changes in travel behavior, and continues with a discussion about how we can plan for a future that will enable climate resilient and equitable communities. [Show ID: 35944]
Published 05/06/20
How Zebrafish help in the search to produce blood stem cells, California's Alpha Clinics, the extraordinary UC Natural Reserve system, and developing an innovative crowd-sourced network of remote sensors to track change in the ocean - on surfboards. Series: "On Beyond" [Show ID: 35686]
Published 04/01/20
Published 04/01/20
In the fight against climate change, those with the least resources have been left behind. In the case of solar power, the vast majority of investment in the United States has gone to majority-white communities. This means not only are people of color losing out on the benefit of solar power, but society as a whole is losing out on potential advocates for clean energy. Dan Kammen, a professor at UC Berkeley's Goldman School of Public Policy is researching how we can reverse this trend and...
Published 02/24/20
How should we teach depressing material about climate change and social injustice to college students the very generation saddled with "fixing" all our problems in the current political and historical moment? Sarah Jaquette Ray, Humboldt State University, focuses on her ethnographic research and describes strategies for connecting students' emotional responses to the material in order to combat apathy and despair and to generate empowerment to effect positive change. She ends her talk by...
Published 02/21/20
After more than three decades, the public is finally beginning to grasp what a serious threat global warming poses. Whats missing from the climate conversation now is a plausible narrative about how we might parry this threat. Drawing on ideas from his recently published book, Under the Influence: Putting Peer Pressure to Work, Robert Frank explains why our ability to tap the prodigious power of behavioral contagion may make the path forward less daunting than many think. Series: "UC Public...
Published 02/11/20
The ocean plays a major role in regulating Earth’s temperature through exchange of chemicals and microbes with the atmosphere. When waves break, ocean-derived biological species including viruses and bacteria are transferred into the atmosphere. These species can ultimately form clouds, altering precipitation and climate. Highlights will be presented of novel experiments being conducted in a unique ocean-atmosphere simulator developed by the National Science Foundation (NSF) Center for...
Published 01/27/20
Around the world, individuals and families are fleeing their countries of origin because of war, violence, natural disasters, and climate change. As their numbers swell, host countries face calls to exclude them. Two prominent local religious leaders of especially targeted and vulnerable populations Bishop Robert McElroy of the Roman Catholic Diocese of San Diego and Imam Taha Hassane of the Islamic Center of San Diego speak about a common path forward for our society, based on the wisdom...
Published 12/10/19
Climate change, caused primarily by the greenhouse gas emissions of the world's most affluent populations, is having a disproportionate impact on socially and economically subordinated populations all over the world. Although climate change is anticipated to displace between 200 million and 1 billion people by 2050, the racialized hostility of the US, the European Union, and Australia to persons fleeing poverty, conflict, and environmental degradation does not bode well for climate refugees....
Published 12/04/19
Transforming our energy infrastructure to support greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction goals will require the deployment of technologies such as electric vehicles and energy storage. Improper integration of these technologies into the electric grid and a lack of careful planning of their scale, however, can significantly reduce their real-world effectiveness in supporting GHG emissions reduction goals. Research by Brian Tarroja and his colleagues at UC Irvine presented here focus on...
Published 11/13/19
Researchers at UC San Diego are working on cutting edge technology to combat the constant threat of wildfires in California. The WIFIRE Lab is a collaboration between the Qualcomm Institute and the San Diego Supercomputer Center. The technology uses big data from cameras, weather stations, topography and other sources to quickly predict where wildfires will spread. And, it's not just theoretical. Fire departments like LAFD are actively using WIFIRE to get ahead of blazes before they get out...
Published 11/12/19
California's recent drought has highlighted the need for a reliable source of water. Peter Stricker of SeaWell presents a reverse osmosis (RO) system to address climate-driven drought which is an entirely new approach to water supply. The SeaWell buoy is a self-contained floating vessel, moored to the sea floor, with seawater intake and brine diffusion outfall. It contains reverse osmosis equipment, electric power and water piping, and can permeate water at a rate of 950–3,800 acre-feet/year....
Published 10/30/19
From highways to trains to housing, where governments spend money can have a major impact on the environment and the economy. Join California State Treasurer Fiona Ma, the Center for Environmental Public Policy at the Goldman School of Public Policy and the Berkeley Forum for a discussion on major finance policy issues facing the State of California, including green bonds and sustainable finance. Fiona Ma is California’s 34th State Treasurer. She was elected on November 6, 2018 with more...
Published 10/28/19
Climate change and atmospheric rivers are bringing flood water to people’s homes, devastating communities. Entire towns are moving to escape rising waters, which is called managed retreat. Flood experts at UC Davis, including Nicholas Pinter, are visiting dozens of communities who have moved off the floodplain and to higher ground to avoid flooding. Series: "UCTV Prime" [Show ID: 35171]
Published 09/09/19
Extremely sensitive to shifts in temperature, the ochre sea star is considered a “keystone species” for monitoring the effect of changing air and ocean temperatures on California’s marine life. Eric Sanford of the UC Davis Bodega Bay Marine Lab puts these beautiful creatures to the test, using their appetite for mussels as the yardstick. Series: "UCTV Prime cuts" [Science] [Show ID: 24211]
Published 09/05/19
At the 24th meeting of the Parties to the UN Climate Change Convention, governments completed the so-called Paris Rulebook, the set of guidelines for implementing the Paris Climate Change Agreement, and attention is shifting to implementation of measures that cut greenhouse gas emissions. Mark Radka, Chief of the Energy and Climate Branch at UN Environment, describes how the UN works with countries, companies, and people to reduce the emission of greenhouse gases. Series: "Bren School of...
Published 09/05/19
The Arctic is changing rapidly in response to changes in global climate and economic activity and yet much of it remains unexplored with modern scientific techniques. Jeff Bowman describes his group's work in the Arctic as they seek to understand the ecological implications of changing sea ice conditions, and prepare to participate in the MOSAiC expedition; an unprecedented multi-national effort to study the high Arctic across a complete seasonal cycle. Series: "Jeffrey B. Graham Perspectives...
Published 08/03/19
Collapsing ice shelves and calving of large icebergs in Greenland and Antarctica have recently become major drivers of sea level rise. The rapidity of these changes has come as a surprise, revealing major gaps in our understanding of how ice sheets respond to a changing climate. To a large extent, these gaps are due to the lack of measurements from the marine edge of glaciers - the Achilles' heel of glaciers. For over a decade, since the glaciers in Greenland began their retreat, Fiammetta...
Published 07/06/19
The atmosphere is composed of gases such as oxygen, nitrogen and carbon dioxide. Other gases are present at much lower concentrations and include ozone, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides and formaldehyde just to name a few. But there is something else in the air we breathe: microscopic particles called aerosols. Vicki Grassian discusses aerosols, their many sources, and how they impact the Earth’s climate and human health in ways we are just starting to understand. Series: "Exploring Ethics"...
Published 06/26/19
Earths climate is a complex system with global scale interactions spanning the tropics to the poles. Join emeritus Professor and past Scripps Director Charles Kennel as he reveals the potential of arctic sea ice loss to influence the intensity of climate events such as El Nino, and raises the possibility that more changes in weather patterns and extreme events are to come. Series: "Jeffrey B. Graham Perspectives on Ocean Science Lecture Series" [Show ID: 34571]
Published 05/31/19
A panel of experts discusses climate change and its effects on our agriculture and our health, while also offering insights into how we as individuals can work to limit its negative impacts and create positive change. Series: "The UC Wellbeing Channel " [Show ID: 34568]
Published 05/06/19