Episodes
Jacqueline Woodson, author of many books including the National Book Award-winning Brown Girl Dreaming (Nancy Paulsen Books, 2014), talks about how Dr. King's life and legacy have influenced her work, from her prize-winning grade school poem to her calling to write for children who might not see themselves in books.
Published 01/17/22
Published 01/17/22
Building off what Jacqueline Woodson said about her work against the absence of stories about people of color like her, listeners call in to share the first time they saw themselves reflected in literature or a piece of pop culture.
Published 01/17/22
Kai Wright, host of the WNYC podcast The United States of Anxiety, talks about the push for voting rights in the United States today and in history.
Published 01/17/22
Listeners reflect on their meetings with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and the ways in which his message is taught in the present.
Published 01/17/22
Joy Bivins, director of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, talks about first year leading the Center, also to catch the final week of their Subversion & The Art of Slavery Abolition exhibition and discusses the collection originated by Arturo Schomburg with it's value in teaching Black history. 
Published 01/17/22
Three of our favorite segments from the week, in case you missed them. Dyslexia 101 (First) | Why NOT to Catch Omicron for the Immunity (Starts at 31:19) | NYC's Gambian Community Leads Bronx Fire Relief Efforts (Starts at 60:45) If you don't subscribe to the Brian Lehrer Show on iTunes, you can do that here.
Published 01/14/22
Jessica Gould, WNYC and Gothamist reporter, and Jaclyn Jeffrey-Wilensky, data reporter for WNYC and Gothamist, talk about the hectic start to 2022 in NYC public schools, from changing testing protocols and staff shortages to a student walkout demanding a remote learning option.
Published 01/14/22
As the Adams administration inherits crisis conditions at Rikers, those detained at one of the island's jail facilities refused dozens of meals during the past week in protest of their living conditions. They claim unnecessary covid isolation, freezing temperatures and denied access to mail, legal services and healthcare. This as criminal justice reformers question the influence of jails unions on the mayor and Department of Correction commissioner as many of the complaints are rooted in...
Published 01/14/22
Devlin Barrett, reporter focusing on national security and law enforcement for The Washington Post, discusses the Justice Department's response to last January's attack on the US capitol, including news that the founder of the right-wing extremist group Oath Keepers was arrested and charged with seditious conspiracy for his role in the riot.
Published 01/14/22
We check in on our year-long project #BLTrees, following the seasons through the trees around us with Marielle Anzelone, ecologist and botanist and founder of NYC Wildflower Week.  This month, psychologist Ming Kuo, an associate professor of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences and the director of The Landscape and Human Health Laboratory at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, shares her research into the positive effects of seeing and experiencing trees and greenery on...
Published 01/14/22
Katherine Wu, staff writer at The Atlantic who covers science, talks about the latest omicron news, including why the CDC's new guidance about how long to isolate after infection is so confusing. →"Should I Just Get Omicron Over With?" (The Atlantic, Jan. 5, 2022)→"America’s COVID Rules Are a Dumpster Fire" (The Atlantic, Jan. 6, 2022)
Published 01/13/22
Jeffery Mays, politics reporter on the Metro Desk for The New York Times, and Katie Honan, reporter at The City, talk about the Mayor's first 13 days in office and his recent appointments, including hiring his brother to run mayoral security.
Published 01/13/22
Theodoric Meyer, national political reporter and co-author of the Power Up newsletter at The Washington Post, discusses the latest news from Washington, including ongoing reactions to Biden's speech on voting rights and the filibuster as the MLK day deadline approaches. Plus, how is the Big Lie influencing Democrat and Republican strategy for the midterms.
Published 01/13/22
Although the pandemic has impacted the television and film industry, it hasn't made much of an appearance on the other side of the camera. Listeners call in to share how they are seeing — or not seeing — COVID show up in what they are watching. Good Fight did away with covid in a "previously on" type montage and then featured a long covid story line for one character amid a mask-free "reality." Station 11, which is about a flulike pandemic, has embraced what can be build in the wake of...
Published 01/13/22
Al Sharpton, civil rights leader, host of MSNBC’s PoliticsNation, founder and president of the National Action Network (NAN) and the author of Righteous Troublemakers: Untold Stories of the Social Justice Movement in America (Hanover Square Press, 2022), talks about his new book and civil rights in NYC and the country today.
Published 01/12/22
Every year, The Brian Lehrer Show asks you to submit the best photo you took that is sitting on your phone – and every year, you deliver with some truly impressive snaps!  This year, you submitted over 700 photos. Our partners at Photoville, along with a special guest judge, New York Times photographer, Michelle Agins, picked out their 60 favorites (check out that gallery, here). Brian speaks with Michelle Agins and Photoville's Dave Shelley about the three winning photos, which you can see...
Published 01/12/22
A significant number of the victims in Sunday's deadly Bronx apartment fire were from the West African nation of Gambia. Salim Drammeh, president of the Gambian Youth Organization which put together a GoFundMe page to raise donations for those affected by the fire, talks about relief efforts and experiences from the Gambian community in the Bronx and in the listening area. Plus, a few minutes with Gambian ambassador to the United States Dawda Docka Fadera, who traveled to the Bronx to...
Published 01/12/22
U.S. Representative Mondaire Jones (D- NY17,  Rockland County and part of Westchester County) talks about his support of reforming the filibuster to pass voting rights legislation, plus his proposal to add four justices to the Supreme Court.
Published 01/12/22
The majority of the New York City Council members are new and are part of a class that is the most diverse and progressive in city history. Over the next year Brian Lehrer will get to know all 51 members. This week we hear from Councilmember Carlina Rivera on her priorities for District 2, which reaches from parts of the Lower East Side and through the East Village to Murray Hill. As a way to get to know each member we're asking them to bring a "show and tell" from their district, and Rivera...
Published 01/11/22
Craig Spencer, New York City emergency medicine physician and director of global health in emergency medicine at Columbia University Irving Medical Center, describes the landscape of omicron infection in New York City hospitals, from "incidental infections" to staff shortages caused by doctors and nurses having to isolate after testing positive. →"As an E.R. Doctor, I Fear Health Care Collapse More Than Omicron" (NYTimes, Jan. 10)
Published 01/11/22
Celia Fisher, professor of psychology and director Center for Ethics Education at Fordham University, talks about her research into why parents balk at vaccinating their children against COVID. →"COVID-19 Pediatric Vaccine Hesitancy among Racially Diverse Parents in the United States" (Vaccines, Dec. 27, 2021)  
Published 01/11/22
U.S. Representative Ritchie Torres (D-NY15) and New York State Senator Gustavo Rivera (D-33) who chairs the Health Committee, discuss the deadly fire that happened in their Bronx districts on Sunday, including relief efforts for the predominantly West African community impacted, as well as what's being done in Washington and Albany on building safety, affordable housing and public health.  
Published 01/11/22
More than 60 people were injured and at least 19 people have died after a space heater sparked an enourmous fire in a high-rise apartment building in the Bronx. Charles Jennings, associate professor of Security, Fire and Emergency Management, and director at the Christian Regenhard Center for Emergency Response Studies (RaCERS) at John Jay College of Criminal Justice (CUNY), and Jake Offenhartz, reporter for Gothamist and WNYC, talk about what happened and answer listener questions about fire...
Published 01/10/22
Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg talks about his first month in office and where the office will focus its prosecutions and responds to the new NYPD commissioner's concerns.
Published 01/10/22