The Huntington
John Crichton, proprietor of the Brick Row Book Shop in San Francisco, shares the story of pioneering entrepreneur Anton Roman (1828-1903), who came to California to make his fortune in the goldfields but became one of the most important booksellers in the West.
Researcher T.J. Stiles describes the last year of Custer's life through the eyes of teenager Bertie Swett. Swett came to know Custer and his wife Libbie at Fort Abraham Lincoln and in Manhattan while America approached a historic turning point. Swett bared witness to the notorious soldier's life...
Award-winning author Susan Straight is joined by novelist Lisa See for a conversation about Straight's powerful new memoir, In the Country of Women, which traces the lives of six generations of immigrant and multiracial women in her extended family.
James Walvin, professor emeritus at the University of York and the Los Angeles Times Distinguished Fellow at The Huntington, discusses the widespread global ramifications of African slavery that transformed the cultural habits of millions of people.
The Civil War witnessed a number of critical turning points. Major battles, the Emancipation Proclamation, the election of 1864, and the New York City draft riots represent the kinds of military, political, and social events that could signal a profound shift in the conflict's direction or...
Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, the 300th Anniversary University Professor of History at Harvard University, shares stories from the remarkable diary of Caroline Crosby.
Kristen L. Chiem, associate professor of art history at Pepperdine University, explores the role of floral imagery in Qing-dynasty China.
Andrea Wulf, the New York Times bestselling author, discusses her new illustrated book "The Adventures of Alexander von Humboldt"—her second work about the intrepid explorer and naturalist.
Sue Fawn Chung, professor emerita at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, presents facts and fictions about late 19th-century Chinese railroad workers, introducing newly published work on the subject: The Chinese and the Iron Road.
Steven Usselman, historian and author, traces how the invention of the deep well centrifugal pump triggered a cascade of change that reshaped the Golden State.
Larry Nittler, Department of Terrestrial Magnetism at the Carnegie Institution for Science, discusses his use of microscopic analyses to understand what tiny grains of dust in meteorites can tell us about the evolution of stars and the matter that became the sun and planets.
The southwestern desert has long stood for American individualism, modernist and anti-modernist sentiments, and social and political experiments. As such it has attracted artistic and architectural movements that give form to these ideas. This conference brings together scholars from diverse...
Steven Shapin, the Franklin L. Ford Research Professor of the History of Science at Harvard University, discusses examples drawn from biology and contemporary art that contradict the widely held view that artistic productions are "things made up" and scientific knowledge consists of "things found...
Glenn Webb, professor emeritus at Pepperdine University, discusses the globalization of the Japanese tea ceremony in the decades following World War II. Webb's lecture inaugurates the Dr. Genshitsu Sen Lecture Series, which focuses on Japanese tea culture.
Peter Moore, writer and lecturer at the University of Oxford, discusses an 18th-century coal collier from a small port in northern England came to define an entire age.
Jennifer Van Horn, assistant professor at the University of Delaware, discusses the goods Anglo-Americans purchased and used in the 18th century, from dressing tables to portraits to peg legs.
Experience the inspiration behind Liu Fang Yuan, the Garden of Flowering Fragrance, in this 42-minute walking tour. The garden combines the beauty of nature with the expressiveness of literature to give deeper meaning to the landscape. Filled with literal and symbolic meanings, a walk through Liu...
Experience the inspiration behind Liu Fang Yuan, the Garden of Flowering Fragrance, in this 42-minute walking tour. The garden combines the beauty of nature with the expressiveness of literature to give deeper meaning to the landscape. Filled with literal and symbolic meanings, a walk through Liu...
Experience the inspiration behind Liu Fang Yuan, the Garden of Flowering Fragrance, in this 42-minute walking tour. The garden combines the beauty of nature with the expressiveness of literature to give deeper meaning to the landscape. Filled with literal and symbolic meanings, a walk through Liu...
Tom Ford, fashion designer and filmmaker, discusses the making of his 2009 film, A Single Man, based on Christopher Isherwood's semi-autobiographical novel, published in 1964. Isherwood's archive, including the manuscript of the novel, is part of The Huntington's literary collections.
Shigehisa Kuriyama, professor of cultural history at Harvard University, discusses the Inshoku yōjō kagami (Rules of Dietary Life), a Japanese woodblock print produced around 1850.
A collection of Founder's Day Lectures throughout the years at The Huntingon.
The Huntington is among the nation’s most important centers for the study of the American West with an unsurpassed collection of materials that spans the full range of American western settlement, including the overland pioneer experience, the Gold Rush, and the development of Southern...
This interdisciplinary conference explores recent conversations in the study of sexuality in early modern England, with particular focus on historicist and queer methodologies, and seeks to move the field beyond current methodological debates by presenting scholarship on the intersection of the...
William Deverell, the director of the Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West, hosts a brown bag luncheon series in which he interviews historians, journalists, and novelists about their work.
Encompassing approximately 120 acres of the 207-acre grounds, the botanical gardens contain more than a dozen thematic areas, including the Desert Garden, Japanese Garden, and a Chinese garden called Liu Fang Yuan, the Garden of Flowing Fragrance. A Botanical Center features classrooms, research...
Art
The Huntington exhibits its permanent collections of European art from the 15th to the early 20th century and American art from the late 17th to the late 20th century. Special exhibitions are presented, as well, and include those developed from the permanent collection as well as loan shows that...
The furniture of midcentury craftsman Sam Maloof (1916-2009) and the art made by 35 members of his circle of friends are explored in a groundbreaking exhibition at The Huntington. “The House That Sam Built: Sam Maloof and Art in the Pomona Valley, 1945-1985” includes commentary by seven artists...
The Pacific region has become increasingly prominent in contemporary global economics, politics, and cultural affairs. Historical studies of these phenomena trace the evolution of Pacific connections and migrations in the early modern and modern eras. This conference, held at the Huntington...
Inspired by the centuries-old Chinese tradition of private gardens designed for scholarly pursuits, The Huntington’s Chinese garden—Liu Fang Yuan, or the Garden of Flowing Fragrance—combines the scenic beauty of nature with the expressiveness of literature to give deeper meaning to the landscape....
“Three Fragments of a Lost Tale: Sculpture and Story by John Frame” brings together a body of work by sculptor John Frame who carefully assembled some three dozen intricately carved sculptures, still photography, and stop-motion animation. This exhibition is on view at The Huntington from Mar....
"Discover The Huntington" is a series of 4 short videos with accompanying printable study guides, teacher aids, and vocabulary worksheets designed to inspire, excite and orient students, teachers and the general public coming to The Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens. The...
The Huntington Art Gallery is home to the European art collection, which focuses on works from the 15th to the early 20th century. It consists of about 400 paintings, 300 sculptures, 2,400 objects of decorative art, and some 20,000 prints and drawings. The in-depth Adult Tour highlights some of...
The Huntington Art Gallery is home to the European art collection, which focuses on works from the 15th to the early 20th century. It consists of about 400 paintings, 300 sculptures, 2,400 objects of decorative art, and some 20,000 prints and drawings. The in-depth Adult Tour highlights some of...
The Huntington Art Gallery is home to the European art collection, which focuses on works from the 15th to the early 20th century. It consists of about 400 paintings, 300 sculptures, 2,400 objects of decorative art, and some 20,000 prints and drawings. The in-depth Adult Tour highlights some of...
Literature and Theatre
Encompassing approximately 120 acres of the 207-acre grounds, the botanical gardens contain more than a dozen thematic areas, including the Desert Garden, Japanese Garden, and a Chinese garden called Liu Fang Yuan, the Garden of Flowing Fragrance. A Botanical Center features classrooms, research...
Curator David Mihaly highlights several works from the recent exhibition “The Color Explosion: Nineteenth-Century American Lithography from the Jay T. Last Collection,” which was on view at The Huntington from Oct. 17, 2009, to Feb. 22, 2010.
During the 1920s and 1930s, African American arts and culture flowered throughout the United States, with much of the activity taking place in the Harlem neighborhood of New York City. The co-curators of a fall 2009 exhibition at The Huntington discuss the vital role Los Angeles played in the...
This symposium investigates the history of garden plant domestication in China, focusing on such topics as horticultural techniques, the origins and distribution of important species, and the knowledge gained from literary records to DNA analysis.
The 22nd North American James Joyce Conference took place June 12–16, 2011, at The Huntington and Caltech, with a full slate of academic panels and several programs open to the public. The theme of the conference was “Joyce in Science and Art.” Notable public events included a reading and...
Jonathan Levy, associate professor of history at Princeton University, discusses the history of entrepreneurship as an idea, focusing upon the values that American entrepreneurs have shared and created from the early 20th century to today. This is part of the Haaga Lecture series at The Huntington.
The Huntington is among the nation’s most important centers for the study of the American West with an unsurpassed collection of materials that spans the full range of American western settlement, including the overland pioneer experience, the Gold Rush, and the development of Southern...
Frank Guridy, associate professor of history at the University of Texas at Austin and the Ray A. Billington Visiting Professor at Occidental College, discusses the rituals of labor and leisure that have played out at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum over the past century. This is part of the...
Author and filmmaker Liz Goldwyn discusses her book "Sporting Guide", a series of interlinked stories that evoke a lost world on the margins of Los Angeles society in the 1890s.
This conference explores the shadowy realms of the Atlantic that connected four continents but also disrupted its various imperial structures. The participants will investigate important historical and historiographical questions about the nature of unlawful exchanges and the relationship between...
The Huntington presents the Distinguished Fellow Lecture Series, featuring notable scholars from around the world.
This conference, organized in honor of Robert C. Ritchie upon his retirement as W.M. Keck Foundation Director of Research at The Huntington Library, spotlights innovative research on how the exploitation of the oceans changed the institution of slavery, long distance trade, property crime, the...
With the 2006 acquisition of the Burndy Library (a collection of nearly 70,000 items), The Huntington became one the top institutions in the world for the study of the history of science and technology. In November 2008, The Huntington opened Dibner Hall of the History of Science, which features...
Richard Wightman Fox, professor of history at the University of Southern California and author of Lincoln’s Body: A Cultural History, explores how, in the 150 years since Lincoln’s assassination, Americans have tied Lincoln's eloquent words and heroic deeds to his utterly unique physical body.