The Huntington
Held in the last year of the national commemoration of the Civil War Sesquicentennial, leading historians offer fresh perspectives on the turbulent conclusion of the conflict. Speakers discuss prominent political and military leaders, Abraham Lincoln’s assassination, and other episodes that...
The concept of the frontier among scholars has changed considerably over the past 25 years. This symposium invited historians, literary scholars, and cultural critics to revisit the famed Frontier Thesis written by Frederick Jackson Turner more than 100 years ago. In three panel discussions,...
Noted architect Brian Tichenor discusses the life of one of the first landscape architects in Southern California, Ralph Cornell's, and examines three of his highly significant landscape designs. The lecture is presented in collaboration with the California Garden and Landscape History Society.
Barbara Lamprecht, an architectural historian, explores Richard Neutra's unique contribution to architecture: designing environments that fused buildings and settings to create "habitats."
Coinciding with the Huntington Library's exhibition in recognition of the 300th anniversary of the birth of Father Junípero Serra, this conference brings together an international group of scholars to explore larger contexts within which Serra lived and the various ways he has been represented...
Paul Theroux, one of the most acclaimed travel writers of our time, turns his unflinching eye on an American South too often overlooked. Theroux also discusses his recently published book, “Deep South”.
The sixth biennial Francis Bacon Conference took place from March 10 to 12, 2016, at the California Institute of Technology and The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens. Titled General Relativity at One Hundred or GR 100, the three-day conference is occasioned by the...
The Symposium, held in the Brody Botanical Center at The Huntington, features lectures from a wide variety of fields, including the sciences, botany, photography, botanical art history, the digital world and tours of The Huntington's gardens, collections, and art galleries.
Robert Hellyer, associate professor of East Asian history at Wake Forest University, examines Japan's emergence in 1870 as a tea exporting nation, and how its emphasis on green tea influences U.S. tea-drinking.
David Loewenstein, Erle Sparks Professor of English and Humanities at Penn State, discusses the daring originality of Milton's "Paradise Lost." This year marks the 350th anniversary of the great poem's first publication in 1667. This talk is part of the Ridge Lecture Series at The Huntington.
The Huntington hosts the East Asian Garden Lecture series, spanning topics and discussions by prominent speakers about gardens across the Pacific.
The Huntington was founded in 1919 by Henry E. Huntington, an exceptional businessman who built a financial empire that included railroad companies, utilities, and real estate holdings in Southern California. Along with his wife, Arabella Duval Huntington, he amassed extensive library, art, and...
This conference investigates the nature and significance of the Protestant Reformation as a global phenomenon. Leading scholars from Europe and the United States offer fresh perspectives on the dynamics of religious change by examining the roles of institutions, interpretative communities, and...
What are “religious affections” and how have they influenced individuals, communities, and cultures? Leading experts in history, literature, and religious studies explore how religion shaped the roots, limits, and consequences of affections in the diverse terrain of early America. The conference...
To mark the 400th anniversary of the publication of the landmark folio “The Works of Ben Jonson,” experts in the field explore the English dramatist’s impact in his own time and his reputation down to the present. The conference was held at The Huntington Sept. 16–17, 2016.
Mary Fissell, professor of the history of medicine at Johns Hopkins University, discusses Aristotle’s Masterpiece. First published in London in 1684, it became one of the most popular medical books ever published in England and America. The lecture is sponsored by the George Dock Society for the...
Jointly presented by The Huntington and Carnegie Observatories, this conference marks the centennial of the completion of the 100-inch Hooker telescope on Mount Wilson, which saw “first light” in November 1917 and heralded the dawn of modern astronomy. Historians, scientists, and others explore...
As part of its regular program of public lectures, The Huntington hosts a variety of authors speaking about their own books on themes related to The Huntington’s collections.
Peter Del Tredici, Senior Research Scientist, Emeritus, of the Arnold Arboretum at Harvard University, will examine the history of early introductions of Japanese plant species to North America, some of which had a profound impact on both cultivated and wild landscapes across America.
Hear and Now is a new podcast that connects the incomparable library, art, and botanical collections at The Huntington with the wider world. Join host Giovana Romano Sanchez for a series of short audio essays that explore objects and ideas found at The Huntington along with the brilliant minds...
This conference, sponsored by the Los Angeles Region Planning History Group, examines how the influence of amusement parks has gone beyond fun and money-making to shaping where and how Southern Californians live today.
Author and political commentator Cokie Roberts discusses her new book Capital Dames, The Civil War and the Women of Washington, 1848-1868, which explores the lives of the women of Washington D.C. during the upheaval of the Civil War. Roberts has previously written about the vital female...
The image of a "Chinese garden" that most often comes to mind is that of the white-walled, gray-tiled gardens built by scholar-officials and merchants in the city of Suzhou during the Ming dynasty (1368–1644). Despite its iconic status in the contemporary imagination, the Suzhou-style scholar's...
A collection of Founders' Day Lectures throughout the years at The Huntington.
Huntington President Karen R. Lawrence speaks with Carla Hayden, Librarian of Congress, about why archives and libraries exist and why the work they do continues to be important.
Huntington President Karen R. Lawrence speaks with Drew Gilpin Faust, former president of Harvard and Civil War scholar, about the importance of the humanities.
Hui-shu Lee, professor of Chinese art history at UCLA, reflects on two recipients of the Pritzker Architecture Prize—I. M. Pei and Wang Shu—and their instrumental reinterpretations of Chinese garden design for the modern and post-modern worlds.
Featuring Paul G. Haaga Jr., Huntington Trustee emeritus, chair of the board of NPR, and retired chair of Capital Research and Management Company, in conversation with Meg Whitman, CEO of Quibi, former president and CEO of Hewlett Packard Enterprise and eBay Inc., and 2010 Republican nominee for...
Rose hybridizer Tom Carruth, the E. L. and Ruth B. Shannon Curator of the Rose Collections at The Huntington, discusses how he developed his newest floribunda, 'Huntington's 100th', named in honor of the institution's Centennial Celebration.
Rob Iliffe, professor of the history of science at the University of Oxford, discusses two little-known documents that reveal how Isaac Newton's approach to prosecuting contemporary counterfeiters as a warden of the Royal Mint was closely related to his strategy for revealing the corruption of...
Civil War scholar and former Harvard president Drew Gilpin Faust explores the ways The Huntington's collections have served as a critical resource for our understanding of the Civil War for this 2020 Founders' Day Lecture. Although the collection started with Henry Huntington, it has expanded...
Joyce Chaplin, James Duncan Phillips Professor of Early American History at Harvard University, revisits "The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin," which was one of Henry Huntington's most prized manuscript acquisitions. Franklin tells a tantalizingly open-ended story about his life because the...
Sally Gordon (University of Pennsylvania) and Kevin Waite (Durham University) explore the role of the Mormon Church and the spread of slavery across the continent in the mid-19th century through the life of Bridget "Biddy" Mason.
This interdisciplinary conference explored the subterranean world of Elizabethan Catholic print and scribal culture, set against the backdrop of press censorship, illicit printing, book smuggling, subversive scribal publication, and the uses of Catholic writing by government agents. The study of...
Mae Ngai, professor of history at Columbia University, explores The Huntington's collections on the history of the American West, which includes some scattered references of the Chinese people, who were integral to California's history but were not always visible through historical records.
James Brayton Hall, president of the Garden Conservancy, examines what America's gardens say about our culture and how new approaches pioneered by the Conservancy are helping to protect and document these landscapes for the future. Several examples of West Coast gardens are highlighted, including...
Dympna Callaghan, William L. Safire Professor of Modern Letters at Syracuse University, considers Shakespeare's complaints about the limitations on what he could say and how he could say it.
Dennis Kruska, a noted authority on the Yosemite Valley, discusses the literature that enticed sightseers to experience the Yosemite's scenic wonders following the first tourist party to the valley in 1855.
Henry Huntington acquired one of the rarest books in the history of English literature: the so-called "bad quarto" of Hamlet. Zachary Lesser, professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania, discusses how this book's discovery in 1823 transformed our ideas about Hamlet, how it made its way...
The Huntington is among the nation’s most important centers for the study of the American West with an unsurpassed collection of materials that spans the full range of American western settlement, including the overland pioneer experience, the Gold Rush, and the development of Southern...
William Deverell, director of the Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West, explores the life of Henry E. Huntington (1850-1927) against the backdrop of American history. This program is a Haynes Foundation Lecture.
Author Julie Leung and illustrator Chris Sasaki discuss the inspiring true story behind their children's book, Paper Son. Li Wei Yang, curator of Pacific Rim Collections at The Huntington, introduces the program and offers historical context. A book signing follows the talk.
An esteemed panel of astronomers, historians, and engineers explore astronomy's fantastical theories and fascinating discoveries with moderator and Caltech university archivist Peter Sachs Collopy. Panelists include Tracy Drain, JPL Psyche mission deputy project systems engineer; Eun-Joo Ahn,...
Noted ethnobotanist Mark Plotkin and cartographer Brian Hettler of the Amazon Conservation Team discuss the work of Richard Schultes, the 20th-century ethnobotanist, and share their new interactive map, based on the explorer's journals, that tracks his Amazon travels and offers insights into his...
Edmund Russell, professor of history at Carnegie Mellon University and the Dibner Distinguished Fellow at The Huntington, discusses the motives, construction, and consequences of the completion of transcontinental telegraph in 1861.
Leading experts on 18th and 19th-century theatre explore the implications of statutory theatre censorship as Britain grappled with issues of modernity, race, gender, and religion during a period of imperial expansion and conflict.
Sachiko Kusukawa, professor of the history of science at the University of Cambridge, explores the many ways images served early modern science, from anatomical atlases and botanical illustrations to telescopic and microscopic observations.
Eugene Wang, professor of art history at Harvard University, discusses the Qianlong Garden in the northeast corner of the Forbidden City. Built in the 1770s, the whole garden space can be seen as a five-act play.