Episodes
Ardem Patapoutian shared the Kavli Prize in Neuroscience in 2020 for answering a basic question: How does touch actually work?
Published 07/22/21
New research finds they fly around on noise-cancelling wings
Published 07/21/21
New research shows that lightning-quick neural rehearsal can supercharge learning and memory.
Published 07/07/21
Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series: COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks,  Scientific American ’s senior health editors  Tanya Lewis  and  Josh Fischman  catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between.
Published 07/01/21
A study makes the case for the new species based on its looks, genes and sounds
Published 06/23/21
Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series: COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks,  Scientific American ’s senior health editors  Tanya Lewis  and  Josh Fischman  catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between.
Published 06/18/21
Human children: please take note of the behavior of prebirth zebra finches
Published 06/16/21
Scientists found that elephants often sniff pathways—and seem especially attuned to urine.
Published 06/11/21
A pan-coronavirus vaccine could be 'one vaccine to rule them all' and so far have shown strong results in mice, hamsters, monkeys, horses and even sharks.
Published 06/09/21
Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series: COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks,  Scientific American ’s senior health editors  Tanya Lewis  and  Josh Fischman  catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between.
Published 06/04/21
Researchers in the happiest lab in the world tested 375 pups and found they connected with people by eight weeks
Published 06/03/21
Made from microalgae and bacteria, the new substance can survive for three days without feeding, and could one day be used to build living garments, self-powered kitchen appliances, or even window coverings that sequester carbon.
Published 06/02/21
A new experiment shows that bats are born with a fixed reference for the speed of sound—and living in lighter air can throw it off.
Published 05/28/21
Dutch scientist Antonie van Leeuwenhoek made extraordinary observations of blood cells, sperm cells and bacteria with his microscopes. But it turns out the lens technology he used was quite ordinary.
Published 05/26/21
Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series: COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks,  Scientific American ’s senior health editors  Tanya Lewis  and  Josh Fischman  catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between.
Published 05/21/21
One mathematician has spend decades uncovering the deadly calculations of pestilence and plague, sometimes finding data that were hiding in plain sight.
Published 05/20/21
An analysis of the animal’s walking speed suggests that T. rex ’s walking pace was close to that of a human. It’s too bad the king of the dinosaurs didn’t just walk when hungry.
Published 05/14/21
It is like when your cell phone keeps you awake in bed—except mosquitoes do not doom scroll when they stay up, they feast on your blood.
Published 05/11/21
Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series: COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks,  Scientific American ’s senior health editors  Tanya Lewis  and  Josh Fischman  catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between.
Published 05/07/21
It seems like the males will do anything, even fake nearby danger, to get females to stick around to mate.
Published 05/04/21
The rosy-faced lovebirds that live in Phoenix appear to be free riding on our urban climate control.
Published 04/27/21
Today we bring you the fifth episode in our podcast series: COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks,  Scientific American ’s senior health editors  Tanya Lewis  and  Josh Fischman  catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between.
Published 04/23/21
New research shows that members of a bee colony all have the same gut microbiome, which controls their smell—and thus their ability to separate family from foe.
Published 04/20/21
Australia’s critically endangered regent honeyeaters are losing what amounts to their culture—and that could jeopardize their success at landing a mate.
Published 04/16/21
A fast-growing front in the battle against climate change is focused on developing green technologies aimed at reducing humankind’s carbon footprint, but many scientists say simply reducing emissions is no longer enough. We have to find new ways to suck carbon out of the atmosphere. A Maine start-up is looking to raise a sinkable carbon-capturing forest in the open ocean.
Published 04/12/21