Episodes
What in the world is regenerative travel? Kristy Drutman, the host of the Brown Girl Green podcast, takes us deep into green travel, where sustainability is about so much more than carbon offsets. Resources: Brown Girl Green: https://www.browngirlgreen.com Amando Ho: https://www.regenerativetravel.com Paco Guerrero: https://www.gridmagazine.ph To listen to more episodes of Unpacked, click here!
Published 08/04/22
Mark talks to the groundbreaking chef, Asma Khan, about the importance of the Anglo-Indian influence, how food and cooking are undervalued, and the beauty of interfamily lessons across generations. Follow Mark on Twitter at @bittman, and on Facebook and Instagram at @markbittman. Subscribe to Mark's newsletter The Bittman Project at www.bittmanproject.com.
Published 06/28/22
Sweet potato has a larger growing range than the common potato and can thrive from sea level up to nearly 9,800 feet. In the final episode of this season of Climate Cuisine, we’ll talk with a researcher at the International Potato Center in Peru about the incredible root, and a sustainability teacher in Costa Rica who has figured out how to grow everything she and her family consume.Climate Cuisine is part of Whetstone Radio Collective. Learn more about this episode of Climate Cuisine at...
Published 02/23/22
Published 02/23/22
Hey Climate Cuisine fans! I’d love for you to listen to this episode of Fruit Love Letters about persimmons from fellow Whetstone Radio host Jessamine Star. Fruit Love Letters is a curious audio-epistolary foray into the Anthropocene of fruit interwoven with original poetry. If you’ve loved learning about taro, pigeon pea and bananas, you’ll really enjoy the first season of Fruit Love Letters about apples, mulberry, pawpaw and breadfruit among many others, now streaming here wherever you get...
Published 02/22/22
Malabar spinach is a leafy green in the tropics that grows all year round, and its vibrant purple seeds can even be used for hair dye. In this episode, we’ll talk with a Texan woman who dyed her daughter’s hair purple with the seeds, a plant researcher in Washington D.C. describing it is a great alternative food source, and a rooftop gardener in Taipei using it as a spinach substitute. Topics covered in this episode: Min 0:07: Meet Stephanie Fredrickson  Min 2:14: Intro to malabar...
Published 02/16/22
Bamboo is the fastest growing plant in the world; some varieties can grow up to three feet daily. Considered invasive in some parts of the United States, it is embraced in Latin America and Asia for its use in architecture, fashion and food. In this episode, we’ll chat with Hans Friederich, the former director of the International Bamboo and Rattan Organization; Momoko Nakamura, a food educator and storyteller in Japan; Kevindra Soemantri, a food journalist in Indonesia; and Hui Ting Tsai, a...
Published 02/09/22
One of the staple pulses in Indian cuisine, the pigeon pea is much more than just a tasty ingredient in daal. It doubles as a natural fertilizer and can take nitrogen from the air and fix it into the soil. In this episode, we’ll talk with Aeles, an indigenous chef in Taiwan, about the ways her tribe cooks the pea; Vikram Doctor, a food journalist in India on how it’s used in Indian cuisine; and Koreen Brennan, a permaculture instructor based in Florida, on why it’s such a great plant to have...
Published 02/02/22
The breadfruit tree can live up to 100 years and produce more than 2,000 pounds of fruit each season. It’s been a staple in the tropics for generations and can be made into chips, waffles, and porridge. This episode will dive into how it’s eaten in Puerto Rico and Hawai’i. Plus, a bit about its dark history in the slave trade. We’re talking about Mike McLaughlin from the Trees That Feed Foundation, Mike Opgenorth from the National Tropical Botanical Garden in Hawai’i, Juliane Braun, who wrote...
Published 01/26/22
Meet culantro—cilantro’s tropical counterpart. It tastes like a more pungent cilantro, and in the right conditions, it grows all year round. This episode touches on how limited our repetoire of herbs are and the possiblities that come when we expand our selection beyond what's just avaliable at the grocery store. We’ll talk to food blogger Reina Gascon-Lopez on how culantro is used in Puerto Rican cuisine and award-winning cookbook author Andrea Nguyen on how she uses it in Vietnamese...
Published 01/19/22
There are more than 1,000 different types of bananas in the world. So why do we only have one type of banana in the grocery store? This episode is an exploration into the rich diversity of bananas and plantains — and why North American grocery stores only sell one type. We talk with biologist Rob Dunn, who wrote a book about this topic, Von Diaz, an esteemed food writer and cookbook author, Meenakshi J., a freelance journalist who wrote an article about sacred bananas, Vidya Balachander, the...
Published 01/12/22
Cactus isn't just a pretty backdrop in Western movies. It can be used for food, fashion, and biofuel. In fact, some varieties of cacti use 80% less water than traditional crops. We talk with John Cushman, Adrián López Velarde, and Fadi Kattan and explore how it's a crop of the future, how it's been eaten for generations in Mexico, and how it's also a symbol of resistance in Palestine. Topics covered in this episode: Min 0:36: Meet Fadi Kattan Min 3:39: The symbolic resilience of cactus in...
Published 01/05/22
Taro is the basis of many Polynesian creation stories and one of the world's oldest food crops. In fact, it is so important that the Polynesians carried it with them on their boats as they migrated across the Pacific Ocean. Every part of the tuber can be eaten, from the leaves to the tuber, and back in the day a healthy taro patch meant a clean and vibrant waterway. This episode dives into the reason taro is such a staple crop, a bit about all the varieties, and why you cannot eat it raw. We...
Published 12/15/21
Around the world, farmers are increasingly planting cassava rather than other crops to mitigate the effects of drought. Due to cassava’s drought-resistant qualities and ability to survive defoliation, it's an ideal crop for communities impacted by climate change and food insecurity. In today’s episode of Climate Cuisine, we’re discussing how cassava has been feeding people throughout South America, Africa, and Asia. It is one of the most resilient starches out there and can be processed into...
Published 12/08/21
Check out the trailer for #ClimateCuisine hosted by Taipei-based journalist Clarissa Wei. Launching this Wed, Dec 8!
Published 12/08/21