Episodes
A new study published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal found two-thirds of gun-related deaths in Ontario over a 15-year period were suicides affecting men in rural areas. We speak with Dr. David Gomez, the lead author behind the study; Dr. Allison Crawford, a psychiatrist at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health; and Bill Farley, a member of the Men's Sheds organization, about the need for a co-ordinated public health approach to address the issue.
Published 10/20/20
We're asking: how safe is it to trick-or-treat this year? Infectious disease expert, dad and Halloween fan Dr. Matthew Oughton explains why he thinks the festivities can still go ahead safely.
Published 10/20/20
We hear from American political satirist P.J. O'Rourke about his new book, A Cry from the Far Middle: Dispatches from a Divided Land.
Published 10/20/20
Even through the pandemic, Canada's real estate market is booming. We talk to Simon Mammone, a first-time homebuyer in Montreal, about the challenges of securing a home right now, and ask mortgage broker Ron Butler and personal finance columnist Rubina Ahmed-Haq what's driving these hot markets.
Published 10/20/20
A forensic technique called genetic genealogy helped police identify the man they now believe killed nine-year-old Christine Jessop in 1984, but some people have concerns about the investigative tool's privacy implications. Host Matt Galloway speaks with Anthony Redgrave, who worked with Toronto police on Jessop's case, and Brenda McPhail, with the Canadian Civil Liberties Association.
Published 10/19/20
Until now Black players of the video game series The Sims have relied on other gamers to help them create characters that look like them. Now, the game's creators are working to improve the range of skin tones the game offers. We speak with one gamer about why the changes are important.
Published 10/19/20
We turn to Nova Scotia, where an escalation in violence has amplified calls for the federal government to get directly involved in the mounting fishery dispute there. We talk with Sen. Murray Sinclair, former chair of the Truth and Reconciliation Commissioner, about his take on the situation.
Published 10/19/20
We take a virtual trip through Europe to discuss a resurgence in COVID-19 cases, and the criticism and concern over new restrictions. We hear from a restaurant owner in Paris who is trying to keep her business afloat; a virologist in the Czech Republic who worries the country declared a premature victory over the novel coronavirus; and an infectious disease expert in Italy, where cases are on the rise again.
Published 10/19/20
Yotam Ottolenghi and Ixta Belfrage discuss their new cookbook, Flavour, and make the case for why fusion cuisine needs to make a comeback.
Published 10/16/20
There are long lineups to vote in the U.S., but are the long waits a sign of excitement or distrust? We'll talk with Emil Moffatt, a reporter for WABE, the NPR station in Atlanta, hear from some patient voters in Georgia, and talk voter suppression with Carol Anderson, author of One Person, No Vote: How Voter Suppression Is Destroying Our Democracy.
Published 10/16/20
The murder of nine-year-old Christine Jessop shocked Canada in 1984, and led to the wrongful conviction of Guy Paul Morin. On Thursday, police said they've now identified her killer as Calvin Hoover, who died in 2015. Kirk Makin’s book Redrum the Innocent examines the case. He joins us to discuss the long search for a killer and the mistakes made along the way.
Published 10/16/20
A dispute between Indigenous and non-Indigenous lobster fishers in Nova Scotia has exploded into violence, and people fear that worse is to come. We discuss the conflict and its long history with CBC reporter Nic Meloney; Colin Sproul, president of the Bay of Fundy Inshore Fishermen's Association; and Cheryl Maloney, a member of the Sipekne'katik First Nation.
Published 10/16/20
Plus, this year's Kentucky Derby happened amid protests about racism and the killing of Breonna Taylor. Greg Harbut, one of the few Black horse owners in Derby history, was asked to boycott. He tells us about the choice he made. Then, we hear from Bob Heleringer, a former Republican state representative, about how Kentucky may lean on Nov. 3.
Published 10/15/20
And while serving life in prison for murder, Christopher Havens says number theory and math has given his life meaning. Now he's started the Prison Mathematics Project to help others find the same.
Published 10/15/20
The Great Barrington Declaration calls for ending lockdowns and trying to achieve herd immunity for COVID-19, but while the White House is reportedly intrigued, many health professionals are not. We talk to epidemiologist and mathematical modeller Ashleigh Tuite, microbiologist and immunologist John Moore, and Timothy Caulfield, the Canada research chair in health law and policy, who studies misinformation in health, particularly during the pandemic.
Published 10/15/20
First Nations communities that largely avoided the worst of the first wave of COVID-19 are now fearful of what’s to come as the weather gets colder. We talk to Peter Beatty, chief of the Peter Ballantyne Cree Nation in Saskatchewan; Keith Mason, pandemic coordinator in the Kasabonika Lake First Nation in northern Ontario; and Carrie Bourassa, professor of community health and epidemiology at the University of Saskatchewan, and the Indigenous engagement lead for the federal COVID-19 Immunity...
Published 10/14/20
Brad Regehr was appointed the first Indigenous president of the Canadian Bar Association last month. He discusses the work he wants to do, and the need for uncomfortable conversations about racism in Canada.
Published 10/14/20
Saskatoon author Adam Pottle has just published his first children’s book, but he’s urging people not to buy it. He tells us the book contains an illustration that he says is offensive, and undermines the book’s message of inclusion and celebration of deaf culture — but the publisher won’t change it.
Published 10/14/20
It’s not quite a holiday, but a website called Window Swap lets you stare out someone else’s window, to take in a new view from somewhere around the world. Science communicator Samantha Yammine talks about why a change like this is as good as a rest in the pandemic.
Published 10/14/20
A video of a sexist smear against B.C. politician Bowinn Ma has surfaced in the middle of the province’s election campaign — highlighting the sexism still rife in politics. We talk to two B.C. politicians, Nadine Nakagawa, a city councillor in New Westminster, and Nicole Read, former mayor of Maple Ridge, about their experiences.
Published 10/14/20
Raptors head coach Nick Nurse talks to Matt Galloway about COVID-19, racial justice, and leadership on and off the basketball court.
Published 10/13/20
As COVID-19 took hold in the spring, journalist Ethan Lou travelled through China, Singapore, Germany and finally home to Toronto. He discusses what he saw as the virus spread, borders began to close, and the world became still.
Published 10/13/20
Joyce Echaquan, an Atikamekw woman from Manawan, Que., recorded nurses taunting her as she lay dying in a Quebec hospital last month. We talk to Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller, who has called a high-level meeting of federal ministers and Indigenous leaders to address racism in the health-care system.
Published 10/13/20
It’s been 50 years since Canada established relations with the People's Republic of China. We talk to Jeremy Kinsman, who was a young diplomat during those negotiations, about where the relationship goes next. And we discuss China’s human rights abuses and detention of two Canadians with Margaret McCuaig-Johnston, senior fellow at the University of Ottawa and with the China Institute at the University of Alberta.
Published 10/13/20
COVID-19 has been particularly challenging for people experiencing homelessness — but has also led to some new programs to help. We talk to Raquel Winslow, who has been homeless for several years but says she is "ecstatic" to get a place in a new shelter in Coquitlam, B.C., and Dr. Andrew Bond, medical director at Inner City Health Associates in Toronto, who says Canada's increasing affordability crisis is part of the problem.
Published 10/12/20