Episodes
Polling in the days since the storming of the Capitol paints a complex picture. While most Americans do not support the riot, a majority of Republicans do not believe that President Trump bears responsibility. And over 70 percent of them say they believe that there was widespread fraud in the election. Before President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration, we called Trump supporters to hear their views about what happened at the Capitol and to gauge the level of dissatisfaction the new president...
Published 01/19/21
Most Americans treat climate change seriously but not literally — they accept the science, worry about forecasts but tell themselves that someone else will get serious about fixing the problem very soon. The Valve Turners, on the other hand, take climate change both very seriously and very literally. In the fall of 2016, the group of five environmental activists — all in their 50s and 60s, most with children and one with grandchildren — closed off five cross-border crude oil pipelines,...
Published 01/17/21
This episode contains strong language. Three days after being sworn into Congress, Representative Peter Meijer, Republican of Michigan, was sitting in the gallery of the House of Representatives as pro-Trump rioters stormed the Capitol. After the siege, Mr. Meijer made his feelings clear: President Trump’s actions proved that he was “rankly unfit.” A week later, he became one of just a handful of Republicans to vote for impeachment. We talk with Mr. Meijer about his decision, his party and...
Published 01/15/21
“A clear and present danger.” Those were the words used by Nancy Pelosi to describe President Trump, and the main thrust of the Democrats’ arguments for impeachment on the House floor. While most House Republicans lined up against the move, this impeachment, unlike the last, saw a handful vote in favor. Today, we walk through the events of Wednesday, and the shifting arguments that led up to the history-making second impeachment. Guest: Maggie Haberman, a White House correspondent for The...
Published 01/14/21
After the attack on the Capitol, social media platforms sprang into action, deleting the accounts of agitators. Without a central place to congregate, groups have splintered off into other, darker corners of the internet. That could complicate the efforts of law enforcement to track their plans. We ask whether the crackdown on social media has reduced the risk of violence — or just made it harder to prevent. Guest: Sheera Frenkel, a cybersecurity reporter for The New York Times. For an...
Published 01/13/21
At the heart of the move to impeach President Trump is a relatively simple accusation: that he incited a violent insurrection against the government of the United States. We look at the efforts to punish the president for the attack on the Capitol and explain what the impeachment process might look like. Guest: Nicholas Fandos, a national reporter for The New York Times. For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read...
Published 01/12/21
As 2020 drew to a close, a concerning development in the pandemic came out of Britain — a new variant of the coronavirus had been discovered that is significantly more transmissible. It has since been discovered in a number of countries, including the United States. The emergence of the new variant has added a new level of urgency to the rollout of vaccines in the U.S., a process that has been slow so far. Today, an exploration of two key issues in the fight against the pandemic. Guests:...
Published 01/11/21
Without many predators or any prey, rhinos flourished for millions of years. Humans put an end to that, as we hunted them down and destroyed their habitat. No rhino, however, is doing worse than the northern white. Just two, Najin and Fatu, both females, remain. In his narrated story, Sam Anderson, a staff writer at The Times Magazine, visits the pair at the Ol Pejeta conservancy in Kenya, speaks to the men who devote their days to caring for them and explores what we will lose when Najin...
Published 01/10/21
This episode contains strong language.  The pro-Trump mob that stormed the Capitol on Wednesday made their plans in plain sight. They organized on social media platforms and spoke openly of their intentions to occupy the Capitol. But leaders in Washington opted for a modest law enforcement presence. In the aftermath, those security preparations are attracting intense scrutiny. Today, we explore how the events of Jan. 6 could have happened. Guest: Sheera Frenkel, who covers...
Published 01/08/21
This episode contains strong language. It was always going to be a tense day in Washington. In the baseless campaign to challenge Joe Biden’s victory, Wednesday had been framed by President Trump and his allies as the moment for a final stand. But what unfolded was disturbing and previously unthinkable: A mob, urged on by the president, advanced on the Capitol building as Congress was certifying the election results and eventually breached its walls. Today, the story of what happened from...
Published 01/07/21
The long fight for control of the U.S. Senate is drawing to a close in Georgia, and the Democrats appear set to win out — the Rev. Raphael Warnock is the projected winner of his race against Senator Kelly Loeffler, while Jon Ossoff is heavily favored to beat the other incumbent Republican, Senator David Perdue. Today, we look at the results so far from these history-making Senate races and at what they mean for the future and fortunes of the two main parties. Guest: Nate Cohn, a...
Published 01/06/21
Since the presidential election was called for Joe Biden, President Trump has relentlessly attacked the integrity of the count in Georgia. He has floated conspiracy theories to explain away his loss and attacked Republican officials. Today, we speak to Republican activists and voters on the ground and consider to what extent, if at all, Mr. Trump’s rhetoric could discourage Republicans from voting in the runoff elections. For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come...
Published 01/05/21
A strong Black turnout will be integral to Democratic success in the U.S. Senate races in Georgia this week. In the first of a two-part examination of election strategies in the Georgia runoffs, we sit down with Stacey Abrams, a Georgia Democrat who has become synonymous with the party’s attempts to win statewide, to talk about her efforts to mobilize Black voters. And we join LaTosha Brown, a leader of Black Voters Matter, as she heads out to speak to voters. Guest: Audra D.S. Burch, a...
Published 01/04/21
This week, The Daily is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened in the time since they first ran. When Alaska was hit by a devastating earthquake in 1964, it was the voice of Genie Chance — a journalist, wife and mother — that held the state together in the aftermath. In the episode, we heard about sociologists from Ohio State University’s Disaster Research Center rushing to Anchorage to study residents’ behavior. Today, Jon Mooallem, who...
Published 12/31/20
This week, The Daily is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened in the time since they first ran. Scott Watson — a Black police officer in his hometown, Flint, Mich. — has worked to become a pillar of the community. And he always believed his identity put him in a unique position to discharge his duties. After watching the video of the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis police custody in May, his job became a source of self-consciousness...
Published 12/30/20
This week, The Daily is revisiting some of our favorite episodes from this year and checking in on what has happened since the stories first ran. In our society, the public part of mourning is ritualized by a coming together. What do we do now that the opportunity for collective mourning has been taken away? Earlier this year, we heard the story of Wayne Irwin. A retired minister of the United Church of Canada who lost his wife, Flora May, during the coronavirus pandemic. He never once...
Published 12/29/20
This week, The Daily is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened in the time since they first ran. When Jack Nicas, a technology reporter for The Times, first moved to California five years ago, he set about finding a local bar of choice. Unpretentious, cheap and relaxed, the Hatch fit the bill. Over six months during the coronavirus pandemic, he charted the fortunes of the bar and its staff members as the lockdown threatened to upend the...
Published 12/28/20
The escapism of movies took on a new importance during pandemic isolation. Caity Weaver, the author of this week’s Sunday Read, says that to properly embrace this year’s cinematic achievements, the Academy Awards should not only hand out accolades to new releases, but also to the older films that sustained us through this period. If they did, Caity argues, Cher would be on course to win a second Oscar for her performance as Loretta Castorini in 1987’s “Moonstruck” — a film that, under...
Published 12/27/20
This episode contains strong language. This week, The Daily is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened in the time since they first ran. When New York City was the epicenter of the coronavirus crisis in the U.S., Sheri Fink, a public health correspondent for The Times, was embedded at the Brooklyn Hospital Center. In April, she brought us the story of a single day in its intensive care unit, where a majority of patients were sick with the...
Published 12/24/20
A few weeks ago, we put a callout on The Daily, asking people to send in their good news from a particularly bleak year. The response was overwhelming. Audio messages poured into our inboxes from around the world, with multiple emails arriving every minute. There was a man who said that he had met Oprah and realized he was an alcoholic, a woman who shared that she had finally found time to finish a scarf after five years and another man who said he had finished his thesis on representations...
Published 12/23/20
It is a very human thing, at the end of a year, to stop and take stock. Part of that involves acknowledging that some remarkable people who were here in 2020 will be not joining us in 2021. Today, we take a moment to honor the lives of four of those people. And in marveling at the extraordinary and sometimes vividly ordinary facets of their time among us, we hold a mirror up to the complexities of our own lives. For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together,...
Published 12/22/20
The radio host Delilah has been on the air for more than 40 years. She takes calls from listeners across the United States, as they open up about their heavy hearts, their hopes and the important people in their lives. She tells callers that they’re loved, and then she plays them a song. “A love song needs a lyric that tells a story,” she says. “And touches your heart, either makes you laugh, or makes you cry or makes you swoon.” On today’s episode, producers Andy Mills and Bianca Giaever...
Published 12/21/20
“If death practices reveal a culture’s values,” writes Maggie Jones, the author of today’s Sunday Read, “we choose convenience, outsourcing, an aversion to knowing or seeing too much.” Enter home-funeral guides, practitioners who believe families can benefit from tending to — and spending time with — the bodies of the deceased. On today’s Sunday Read, listen to Ms. Jones’s story about the home-funeral movement and the changing nature of America’s funeral practices. This story was written...
Published 12/20/20
For years there has been an evictions crisis in the United States. The pandemic has made it more acute. On today’s episode, our conversations with single mother of two from Georgia over several months during the pandemic. After she lost her job in March, the bottom fell out of her finances and eviction papers started coming. The federal safety net only stretched so far. And we ask, with Congress seeking to pass another stimulus bill, what do the next few months hold for renters in the...
Published 12/18/20
This episode contains strong language. When the photo-sharing app Instagram started to grow in popularity in the 2010s, the chief executive of Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg, had two options: build something comparable or buy it out. He opted for the latter. The subsequent $1 billion deal is central to a case being brought against Facebook by the federal government and 48 attorneys general. They want to see the social network broken up. Will they succeed? On today’s episode, we look at one of...
Published 12/17/20