Episodes
In Hong Kong, hundreds of thousands remain in the streets, even after city officials said they would suspend the contentious extradition bill that prompted the demonstrations in the first place. We look at why the protesters still don’t trust their government. Guest: Austin Ramzy, who covers Hong Kong for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: If the shelving of the extradition bill and an apology from Hong Kong’s leader...
Published 06/17/19
Across Europe, populists are saying that it’s not democracy they aim to discard, but liberalism. To end our series, we returned to Germany, the country at the heart of a liberal Europe, to see if the rejection of liberalism had also taken hold there. Guests: Katrin Bennhold, the Berlin bureau chief for The New York Times, and Clare Toeniskoetter and Lynsea Garrison, producers for “The Daily,” went to an election party in Berlin for the far-right party Alternative for Germany. For more...
Published 06/14/19
In Poland, a nationalist party has been in power for four years. We went to Warsaw, the capital, and Gdansk, the birthplace of a movement that brought down Communism, to see how this government has changed democratic institutions. Guests: Katrin Bennhold, the Berlin bureau chief for The New York Times, and Clare Toeniskoetter and Lynsea Garrison, producers for “The Daily,” spoke with Jaroslaw Kurski, a newspaper editor; Magdalena Adamowicz, a politician and the widow of a liberal mayor who...
Published 06/13/19
In Italy, hard-right populists have moved from the fringes to run the national government. Now, the country is on the front lines of a nationalist resurgence in Europe. To understand why, we spent a day with Susanna Ceccardi, a rising star of the far-right League party. Guest Host: Katrin Bennhold, the Berlin bureau chief for The New York Times, and Clare Toeniskoetter and Lynsea Garrison, producers for “The Daily,” hit the campaign trail with Ms. Ceccardi in Tuscany. For more information on...
Published 06/12/19
President Emmanuel Macron of France had been viewed as the next leader of a liberal Europe. But when the Yellow Vest movement swept the country, protesters took to the streets, rejecting him as elitist and questioning the vision of Europe that he stood for. In Part 2 of our series, we traveled to a city in northern France to hear from some of these protesters. Guest Host: Katrin Bennhold, the Berlin bureau chief for The New York Times, and Clare Toeniskoetter and Lynsea Garrison, producers...
Published 06/11/19
The decades-long plan to stitch together countries and cultures into the European Union was ultimately blamed for two crises: mass migration and crippling debt. Together, those events contributed to a wave of nationalism across Europe. In a five-part series this week, we take a look at some of the movements aiming to disrupt the E.U. from within. Guest: Katrin Bennhold, the Berlin bureau chief for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....
Published 06/10/19
The police identified a suspect in a double murder after combing through DNA profiles on a website designed to connect family members. We look at what his trial will tell us about the future of genetic genealogy in solving crimes. Guests: Heather Murphy, a New York Times reporter, spoke with CeCe Moore, a genetic genealogist, and Curtis Rogers, a creator of the genealogy website GEDMatch. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: The case of...
Published 06/07/19
A year after police used a genetic database to help identify a suspect in the Golden State Killer case, the same technique has been used to arrest dozens of people. Now, for the first time, one of those cases is headed to trial. In Part 1 of a two-part series, we look at the tool that is transforming law enforcement and testing the limits of privacy. Guests: Heather Murphy, a New York Times reporter, spoke with Curtis Rogers, a creator of the genealogy website GEDmatch; Peter Headley, a...
Published 06/06/19
Dr. Robert Grant developed a treatment — a daily pill known as pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP — that could stop the AIDS crisis. We look at why that hasn’t happened. Guests: Dr. Grant, who has been working on H.I.V. treatment and prevention for over 30 years, and Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Gilead Sciences, the maker of Truvada, the only drug approved...
Published 06/05/19
A criminal group has held computer systems for the city of Baltimore hostage for nearly a month — paralyzing everything from email to the real estate market to the payment of water bills. But what residents don’t know is that a major component of the malware used to shut down the system was developed nearby by a federal government agency. Guest: Scott Shane, who covers national security and the U.S. intelligence community for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit...
Published 06/04/19
In a brief but prolific career, a young writer asked whether evangelical Christianity could change. In doing so, she changed it. Guests: Elizabeth Dias, who covers religion for The Times, in conversation with Natalie Kitroeff.  For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Read the Times obituary for Rachel Held Evans, the best-selling author who challenged conservative Christianity and gave voice to a generation of wandering evangelicals wrestling...
Published 06/03/19
A Times investigation found that doctors at UNC Children’s Hospital suspected that children with complex heart conditions had been dying at higher-than-expected rates, and even children with low-risk conditions seemed to do poorly. Secret recordings shared with our colleague reveal what was happening inside the hospital. Guest: Ellen Gabler, an investigative reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:Limited...
Published 05/31/19
Robert Mueller, the special counsel, discussed his investigation of Russian election interference for the first time on Wednesday. He did not absolve President Trump of obstruction of justice, saying: “If we had enough confidence that the president clearly did not commit a crime, we would have said so.” Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, who has been covering the special counsel investigation for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background...
Published 05/30/19
From Day 1, the Trump administration has tried to dismantle regulations aimed at curbing climate change. Now officials are attempting to undermine the very science on which such policies rest. Guest: Coral Davenport, who covers energy and environmental policy for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Parts of the federal government will no longer fulfill what scientists say is one of the most urgent jobs of climate...
Published 05/29/19
In the past year, many New York City taxi drivers have fallen deeper into debt, even as the city moved to rein in ride-hailing apps like Uber and Lyft. Our colleague explains how the rush to blame those apps shielded those who were really behind the crisis. Guests: Brian M. Rosenthal, an investigative reporter on the Metro desk of The New York Times, and Nicolae Hent, a taxi driver in New York City. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: A...
Published 05/28/19
Three months ago, a recording of Sterling Van Wagenen, a founder of the Sundance Film Festival, appeared on an obscure website for whistle-blowers in the Mormon Church. The “Daily” producer Annie Brown spoke with our colleague about the story that recording told. Guest: Elizabeth Harris, a culture reporter for The New York Times, talked to Sean Escobar, who made the recording of Mr. Van Wagenen. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. This episode contains...
Published 05/24/19
At a time when most Wall Street firms had stopped doing business with Donald J. Trump, a single bank lent him more than $2 billion. We look at the two-decade relationship that could unlock the president’s financial secrets. Guests: Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The New York Times, spoke with David Enrich, the finance editor and author of the forthcoming book “Dark Towers: The Inside Story of the World’s Most Destructive Bank.” For more information on today’s episode, visit...
Published 05/23/19
In the weeks since the release of the Mueller report, the Democratic Party has been struggling with how to proceed. Now, divisions are emerging as a group of House members push their leaders to open impeachment proceedings. Guest: Nicholas Fandos, who covers Congress for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Some liberal Democrats called for an impeachment inquiry of President Trump after the former White House counsel,...
Published 05/22/19
India’s prime minister, Narendra Modi, has governed as a right-wing populist whose nationalist message has often pitted Hindus against Muslims. We look at what Mr. Modi’s likely re-election this week tells us about the country’s political future. Guest: Jeffrey Gettleman, the South Asia bureau chief for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Mr. Modi’s Hindu nationalist politics and his efforts to project a strong image...
Published 05/21/19
From the day Roe v. Wade was decided, some have seen the constitutional right to an abortion as an inferred right rather than a guaranteed one. That distinction has become a threat to the law’s survival. Guests: Sabrina Tavernise, a national correspondent for The New York Times, spoke with Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Because the court led by Chief Justice John Roberts tends...
Published 05/20/19
Alabama has adopted a law that would criminalize nearly all abortions and make the penalty for providing one up to 99 years in prison. The man who wrote the law knew it was unconstitutional — and did it anyway. We asked him why. Guests: Eric Johnston, a lawyer in Alabama who has spent more than 30 years trying to ban abortion, and Sabrina Tavernise, a national correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: States...
Published 05/17/19
Yesterday, we told the story of President Trump’s trade war with China. Today, our colleague speaks with two Americans who have been feeling the effects of that war. Guests: Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The New York Times, talked to Kevin Watje, a truck manufacturer in Iowa, and Eldon Gould, a farmer in Illinois. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:President Trump’s tariffs, initially seen as a cudgel to break down trade...
Published 05/16/19
Years of multinational efforts have failed to get China to play by the international rules of trade. Now, President Trump has launched an all-out trade war in which the United States is confronting China on its own. Guests: Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The New York Times, spoke with Peter S. Goodman, an economics correspondent. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:The intensifying trade war between the United States and China,...
Published 05/15/19
When we last spoke with Representative Rashida Tlaib, she had just been sworn in — and had fulfilled the fears of Democratic leaders by calling for the impeachment of President Trump. In the months since, she’s been challenging her party on a different front, attracting controversy for her criticisms of Israel, which some have characterized as anti-Semitic. Ms. Tlaib has repeatedly denied that there’s any anti-Semitism behind what she’s said. But she hasn’t spoken at length about the...
Published 05/14/19
Iran is warning that it may resume production on its nuclear program, reviving a crisis that had been contained by the signing of the Iran nuclear deal four years ago. One man within the United States government may have intentionally brought us to this point. Guest: Mark Landler, who covers the White House for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: After President Hassan Rouhani of Iran declared that he would begin to...
Published 05/13/19