Episodes
Republicans and Democrats don't agree on much, but in Facebook they’ve found a common enemy. When whistleblower Frances Haugen told a congressional hearing the company knew its products damaged the mental health of its young users, senators rushed to proclaim they would get something done. How harmful is Facebook? And will politicians take action? The Economist’s Hal Hodson tells us we need more evidence to understand social media’s impact on wellbeing. We go back to when video games caused...
Published 10/15/21
The effort to investigate last year’s port explosion in Beirut has fired up political and religious tensions—resulting in Lebanon’s worst violence in years. We speak with Dmitry Muratov, a Russian journalist who shared this year’s Nobel peace prize, about what the award means to him, and to press freedom. And why autocratic regimes like to snap up English football clubs. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer...
Published 10/15/21
14 years after “The Sopranos'' ended, the creator of the hit TV series explains why his show is reaching new and younger audiences. Host Anne McElvoy asks whether mobsters have a moral compass and why audiences root for the patriarch Tony Soprano? The Hollywood veteran talks about bringing the story back to life in the prequel movie “The Many Saints of Newark” and why it should be enjoyed in a cinema, not at home. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio...
Published 10/14/21
A fossil-fuel scramble reveals energy markets in desperate need of a redesign. We examine what must be done to secure a renewable future. Throngs of Hong Kong residents fleeing China’s tightening hand are settling in Britain; our correspondent finds an immigrant group unlike any that came before. And the boom in “femtech” entrepreneurs at last focusing on women’s health. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer...
Published 10/14/21
This year's Nobel prize celebrates the "credibility revolution" that has transformed economics since the 1990s. Today most notable new work is not theoretical but based on analysis of real-world data. Host Rachana Shanbhogue speaks to two of the winners, David Card and Joshua Angrist, and our Free Exchange columnist Ryan Avent explains how their work has brought economics closer to real life. Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the...
Published 10/13/21
As the Taliban’s closest ally, the country bears a big responsibility for Afghanistan’s fate. We examine its diplomatic risks and opportunities. Mastercard is pressing porn purveyors this week; we look at how financial companies are reluctantly stepping up as the internet’s police. And a timely social-inequality take drives South Korea’s “Squid Game” to the top of Netflix's charts worldwide. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here...
Published 10/13/21
A probe to study the Trojan asteroids is expected to take off this week, but what will this mission uncover about the formation of the solar system? Also, we explore new technology to observe asteroids, as well as a mission to deflect an incoming celestial object. And, we hear from the Nobel co-laureate in Physiology or Medicine, Ardem Patapoutian, about temperature and pressure sensing. Alok Jha hosts.  For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at...
Published 10/12/21
After a court ruling in Poland that is an affront to a core European Union principle, Poles hit the streets—fearing a “Pol-exit” they do not want. Who will back down? Hydrogen has been touted for decades as a fuel with green credentials. At last its time has come. And the herd of unicorns popping up in Mexico. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Published 10/12/21
Lowering greenhouse gas emissions won’t be enough to stop the world from overheating. Carbon needs to be sucked out of the atmosphere. But can that be done quickly enough -- and on what scale? Nathalie Seddon of the Nature-Based Solutions Initiative explores the ways ecosystems can be enhanced to store carbon. And we go to Iceland to visit the world’s largest direct air capture facility that removes carbon from the air, which is then injected into volcanic rock. Hosted by Vijay...
Published 10/11/21
Where governments enacted zero-tolerance coronavirus strategies, numbers indeed stayed low. That was before the Delta variant. We ask how countries can now wind back those policies. A shocking report of sexual abuse within France’s Catholic church further threatens the institution’s connection with society. And countering the notion that the “standard English” taught the world over is the only proper one.  For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here...
Published 10/11/21
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the world economy’s shortage problem, Abiy Ahmed against the world (9:39) and how fast-fashion label Shein models a new style of Chinese multinational (16:50)   Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Published 10/10/21
When Democrats took control of Congress and the presidency, it raised hopes that real change could happen in a criminal justice system tarnished by racism and police brutality. But federal efforts have stalled and progressive local prosecutors are hitting roadblocks. Why is law enforcement so resistant to reform? The National Sheriffs’ Association’s Jonathan Thompson tells us police are open to some change. We go back to when an amateur video tape shone a light on racist cops. And Boston...
Published 10/08/21
China has sent more than 100 planes to probe Taiwan’s air-defence zone. We explain why Beijing has chosen this moment to send a message across the strait. The WHO has approved a vaccine against malaria—a turning-point in fighting a disease that kills 260,000 African children a year. And if you want a Nobel prize, it helps to be lauded by a laureate.     For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer   See...
Published 10/08/21
Are Western alliances fraying? Anne McElvoy asks the retired four-star US General about the diplomatic fallout from the AUKUS deal. As Chinese jets menace Taiwan, would the US go to war to defend the island? The former commander of US and coalition troops in Afghanistan ponders whether the Taliban could become America’s counter-terrorism allies. And could you follow the General’s lead and exist on one meal a day?  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio...
Published 10/07/21
Abiy Ahmed is sworn in again as prime minister, even as continuing strife increases the country’s isolation. Our correspondent witnesses the gruesome aftermath of a telling battle. China once encouraged, even forced abortions. Now, as it frets about declining birth rates, it’s discouraging them. And we report on India’s “godmen” and “godwomen”, their moneyspinning schemes and their fanatical followers. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here...
Published 10/07/21
Trade used to be about efficiency and growth. But those goals are being overtaken by others, from security to environmentalism. Our Britain economics editor Soumaya Keynes and host Rachana Shanbhogue investigate how the blurring of economic and political concerns is driving—and destabilising—trade relationships, with global consequences. We hear from Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, director-general of the World Trade Organisation, about the WTO’s complicated history and contested future. US Trade...
Published 10/06/21
A global financial centre must move with the times, and—so far—London has not. Our correspondent lays out the causes of the malaise, and how to fix it. For many years compulsory military service was on the decline; we ask why so many countries are bringing it back. And why Europe is the destination for a growing class of digital nomads. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer   See acast.com/privacy for privacy...
Published 10/06/21
A new generation of technologies are transforming the world’s food-production system. Food scientists are producing cruelty-free meat in the lab, growing salad underground in vertical farms and bringing aquaculture on land. The Economist's US digital editor Jon Fasman uncovers the future of food.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Published 10/05/21
Yesterday’s global outage is not even the worst of it: today’s congressional testimony will examine a whistleblower’s allegations that the company knows its products cause widespread harm. The modern food-industrial complex is great for eaters but appalling for the planet; we examine technological fixes, and whether consumers will bite. And how Afghanistan's embassies abroad are—or aren’t—dealing with the Taliban. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist,...
Published 10/05/21
Eating less meat or giving up flying are palpable ways people can help mitigate climate change. But how much does personal action matter? And how should societies meet the challenge of lowering greenhouse gas emissions? Yael Parag of the Reichman University in Tel Aviv weighs the merits of individual carbon budgets. Bruce Friedrich of the Good Food Institute highlights the impact of eating beef. And Jon Fasman, The Economist’s US digital editor, tries a lab-grown meat substitute to assess...
Published 10/04/21
The court will be tackling just about every judicial and social flashpoint in the country during the term that starts today; our correspondent lays out the considerable stakes. A vast and costly die-off of Britain’s trees could have been averted simply and cheaply: just let them stay put. And why hotels are such ideal backdrops for filmmakers and scriptwriters. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer   See...
Published 10/04/21
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: Xi Jinping’s campaign against China's capitalist excesses, how to revive Britain’s stockmarket (10:11), and electric motor city (18:33)    Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Published 10/03/21
Democrats are in a fight to turn President Biden’s signature economic proposals into law. They want to raise the top rates of income tax and increase corporate tax to fund them. It would be the first big hike in federal taxes in nearly three decades. What is the best way to pay for Joe Biden’s vision of America?  The Economist’s Simon Rabinovitch takes us through the president’s tax plans. We go back to the time when the stars of Hollywood’s Golden Age became tax dodgers. And Erica York...
Published 10/01/21
The first conviction of France’s former president shocked the nation; the second confirms for citizens that, these days, politicians will be held to account. Our correspondent meets a Burmese hipster who, after this year’s military coup, has become a somewhat conflicted freedom fighter. And the record label whose name you may never have heard but whose music you certainly have.  For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here...
Published 10/01/21
As trade tensions flare, Anne McElvoy asks the former chief Brexit negotiator about the state of relations between the European Union and the United Kingdom. Can the two sides end a stand-off about the Northern Ireland protocol? The author of “My Secret Brexit Diary” reveals why he wants to be the next president of France. And, after four years of tussles with Britain, would he still call himself an Anglophile?  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio...
Published 09/30/21