Ep 95 Pre-Reg Practice Question 5 Conversion Factor Pharmacology Calculations
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Description
While the UK and United States have different methods for assessing their health professionals often the calculations and math(s) strategies are the same. I invite you to enjoy this 12-part series on Part 5 of preparing for the Pre-Reg exam but will also help those in the states that are looking to improve their skills in nursing, pharmacy technician, and pharmacist skills. Here's the Memorizing Pharmacology book link  https://www.audible.com/pd/Memorizing-Pharmacology-Audiobook/B09JVBHRXK?source_code=AUDFPWS0223189MWT-BK-ACX0-281667&ref=acx_bty_BK_ACX0_281667_rh_us Want more options? Find the book here: https://geni.us/iA22iZ  and subscribe to my YouTube Channel  TonyPharmD here: https://www.youtube.com/c/tonypharmd   Auto Generated Transcript: Welcome to the Memorizing Pharmacology podcast. I’m Tony Guerra, pharmacist and author of the Memorizing Pharmacology book series, bringing you mnemonics, cases, and advice for succeeding in pharmacology. Sign up for the email list at memorizingfarm.com to get your free suffixes cheat sheet, or find our mobile-friendly self-paced online pharmacology review course at residency.teachable.com/p/mobile. Let’s get started with the show. Just to let you know, I did this individually because I’m just curious to see if people will go one through twelve and do every exam question, or if they’ll just look at the exam questions and come back to the ones that they struggle with. So let me just go ahead and read this and talk about translating the conversion factor. So you’ve seen some of the other videos, so I’ll go on to just a second one, but you can see both. So you have the contrast number five: Baby B, who weighs three kilograms. I crossed off one month old because one of the great difficulties with these word problems is getting rid of information that’s not actually relevant to the answer. Now I say that, but that one month old is actually quite important because if you, for example, see 40 mLs per dose, now you might question it just intuitively. Even 4 mLs per dose, you might question just in general. So I cross it off only to make a point that there are extraneous numbers that are detractors. He’s been diagnosed with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Now that’s a little tough for me because we call it GERD - gastroesophageal; we take that O away - but I understand it’s gourd in the UK. He’s been prescribed ranitidine liquid 75 milligrams per 5 mLs at a dose of two milligrams per kilogram per dose. This is really tricky: three doses per one day. And then how many mLs of ranitidine liquid should be administered to Baby B per single dose? As soon as you see this single dose, you really want to get rid of this; cross it off so that you don’t accidentally multiply the result by three. And then give your answer to one decimal place. Okay, so the calculation: again we see that we’re going to have milliliters per dose as our answer. So which conversion factor - just looking globally at this - is going to have mLs on the top? And we see 5 mLs in 75 milligrams works as one conversion factor. We have no milligrams over here, so we need something to get rid of those. And we see that the other conversion factor - two milligrams per kilogram per dose - is over here per dose. And then we have kilograms over here to get rid of those. So we are left with milliliters per dose. We check our work: kilograms, milligrams; kilograms, kilograms; left with milliliters per dose. Multiply 3 times 2 times 5 and divide by 75 to get 0.4 mL per dose. Thanks for listening to the Memorizing Pharmacology podcast. You can find episodes, cheat sheets, and more at memorizingfarm.com. Again, you can sign up for the email list at memorizingfarm.com to get your free suffixes cheat sheet, or find our mobile-friendly self-paced online pharmacology review course at residency.teachable.com/p/mobile. Thanks again for listening. Thank you! Like to learn more? Find my book here: ht
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