Episodes
The first jury trial stemming from the Varsity Blues admissions scandal ended last week with a guilty verdict. It was a big win for prosecutors who relied heavily on exchanges the parents had with the mastermind of the scheme Rick Singer, without ever calling the man himself to testify. Law360’s Boston courts reporter Chris Villani joins the show this week to explain how the strategy paid off, avenues of appeal that remain for the defendants, and what the victory means for the remaining...
Published 10/15/21
A Trump-era program aimed at rooting out Chinese economic espionage has come under fire, with critics arguing that the initiative has stirred up a toxic mix of racial profiling and prosecutorial overreach. Law360 senior reporter Jack Queen joins the show this week to talk about the China Initiative and its encroachment into the academic and scientific communities. Also this week, Tesla is hit with a $137 million verdict in a racial discrimination case, and the Supreme Court declines to review...
Published 10/08/21
A new Supreme Court term is upon us, with the justices set to tackle a slew of lightning rod cases in the coming months. Law360 reporter and The Term co-host Jimmy Hoover joins the show this week to preview all the big cases at the high court, headlined by a direct challenge to Roe v. Wade and the court’s first major gun rights case in over a decade. Also this week, New York’s state court system expels hundreds of employees for failing to comply with its vaccine mandate and the Federal...
Published 10/01/21
Endo Pharmaceuticals and its attorneys at Arnold & Porter are facing accusations of serious discovery misconduct during opioid litigation across the country, threatening the company with huge liability and the lawyers with reputational damage. On this week’s show, we break down the growing debacle, plus: Cancer patients accuse J&J of planning an untested “Texas Two Step” to avoid huge liability over baby powder; Twitter pays more than $800 million to settle claims that it lied about...
Published 09/24/21
President Joe Biden ordered sweeping new vaccine requirements last week in an effort to halt the spread of COVID-19’s delta variant, potentially impacting as many as 100 million American employees in both the public and private sectors. On this week’s episode, senior employment reporter Vin Gurrieri walks us through the mandate and how it will impact the workplace. Also this week, we talk through some of the top line statistics and takeaways from Law360’s annual Glass Ceiling report on women...
Published 09/17/21
On the final installment of the Pro Say Movie Club, we travel to the city of brotherly love for the heart-wrenching story of a lawyer fired for having AIDS. In “Philadelphia” Tom Hanks plays Andrew Beckett, a rising star chosen to lead one of his firm’s biggest cases. But one of the partners notices a lesion on his forehead, a file goes missing, and he’s fired. Beckett teams up with the only lawyer who will take his case, played by Denzel Washington. We discuss the true story that inspired...
Published 09/14/21
The financial industry braced for a surge in bankruptcies in 2021 amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, but instead the number of new filings actually dropped by a third. Law360 senior bankruptcy reporter Vince Sullivan joins the show this week to explain the “eerie” restructuring silence, what caused it, and why experts don’t expect it to last. Also this week, a federal judge decides that robots cannot be “inventors” for the purpose of obtaining a patent; a Texas appeals court overturns a...
Published 09/10/21
The Pro Say Movie Club makes its maiden voyage into the world of John Grisham with a discussion of A Time To Kill, the 1996 adaptation directed by Joel Schumacher and starring just about every famous actor from the 90s. It’s the story of Mississippi litigator Jake Brigance and his defense of Carl Lee Hailey, a black man who took the lives of two white men to avenge a brutal assault on his daughter. This week’s show dives into the movie’s sprawling and somewhat chaotic structure; venue and...
Published 09/07/21
The upcoming criminal trial of former Theranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes figures to center around one crucial question: Was the blood testing startup’s failure a case of misguided Silicon Valley over-ambition, or was it outright fraud? Law360’s Dorothy Atkins has been covering the Theranos litigation for years, and she joins us this week to break down all you need to know ahead of next week’s long-awaited trial. Also on the show: The Supreme Court refuses to halt a Texas law prohibiting abortions...
Published 09/03/21
Can you reverse-engineer an entire movie out of a lawyer joke? That’s the question we’re asking on the Pro Say Movie Club as we talk about Liar Liar, a 1997 Jim Carrey romp about a deeply dishonest attorney named Fletcher Reede who is suddenly put under a magical spell that forces him to tell the truth for 24 hours. On this week’s show, we’re talking about the legal ethics of lying; the baseball career of Jose Canseco; the struggle for work-life balance in BigLaw; the aesthetics of courthouse...
Published 08/31/21
You’ve probably heard of insider trading, but what about “shadow trading”? Federal regulators are pursuing a novel civil lawsuit that claims a pharma executive broke the law by using insider information about his own company to get rich — only he did it by buying another company’s shares. Law360 securities law reporter Dean Seal joins us this week to talk about the phenomenon of shadow trading and how the regulators are trying to crack down. Also this week: Nirvana is hit with a child...
Published 08/27/21
Richard Loving and Mildred Jeter fell in love, found out they were expecting a baby, and ran off to get married. But then they were arrested in their bedroom in the middle of the night. The crime? Back in 1958, Virginia law barred interracial marriage. Their arrest set the stage for a years-long legal fight that made it all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court and changed the future for millions of couples. On this week’s episode of the Pro Say Movie Club we’re talking about the true story...
Published 08/24/21
Requiring COVID-19 vaccination for jury members seems like a public health no-brainer as Delta continues to spike, but it’s raising tricky questions about whether vaccine disparities along racial and political lines could skew jury pools. Joining us this week to discuss the issue is Law360 senior reporter Chris Villani, who breaks down how judges across the country are handling juror vaccination and how trial attorneys are reacting. Also this week: Law360’s annual look at how big firms are...
Published 08/20/21
Driven by the delta variant, Covid-19 infections are spiking across the country, leaving courts and law firms to once again grapple with public health and safety measures. On this week’s episode, we’re breaking down the patchwork of new restrictions, from courthouse mask rules to BigLaw vaccine mandates. Also this week, a public corruption trial with such bad lawyering that the First Circuit granted a redo; and an interesting argument against the Covid-19 eviction ban centered on the...
Published 08/13/21
Some elite lawyers are miracle workers. Others are janitors. Michael Clayton, the eponymous main character of our Pro Say Movie Club pick this week, is the latter. Clayton, played by George Clooney, is a so-called fixer at a prestigious Manhattan law firm who is thrust into crisis after his boss and mentor has a mental breakdown while defending the producer of a deadly weed killer. As the sinister client attempts to contain the problem, Clayton is forced to confront not only an ugly...
Published 08/10/21
Every young associate has probably had a tough boss at their firm, but what if that boss was literally Satan? Our pick for the Pro Say Movie Club this week “The Devil’s Advocate” tells the story of hot shot Florida litigator Kevin Lomax, played by Keanu Reeves, whose perfect courtroom record draws the eye of a tony New York law firm and its enigmatic top partner John Milton, played by Al Pacino. The new caseload presents Kevin with a series of escalating moral crises and rips his family apart...
Published 08/03/21
On this week’s episode of the Pro Say Movie Club, we comb our hair, put on our suits made out of some kind of cloth, and journey to the south with Joe Pesci and Marisa Tomei in the venerable 1992 legal comedy “My Cousin Vinny.” Pesci plays Vincent Gambini, a sharp but inexperienced New York attorney who’s way out of his element defending two “yutes” accused of murdering a store clerk in a small Alabama town. With the help of girlfriend Mona Lisa Vito’s automotive prowess, and some magic...
Published 07/27/21
Earlier this year, New York joined the growing list of states to legalize recreational marijuana. But the Empire State’s law goes a step further by automatically expunging hundreds of thousands of cannabis-related criminal convictions, offering a clean slate to those hampered by aggressive enforcement in the past. Law360 reporter Marco Poggio joins the show this week to break down the impact of this provision, the challenges that lie ahead, and the likelihood of other states following New...
Published 07/23/21
In the Pro Say Movie Club it is our code built on honor and respect for the chain of command to carefully break down outrageous courtroom showdowns in legal cinema. That’s why this week we’re talking about A Few Good Men, the gripping 1992 drama featuring Tom Cruise as a cocky young Navy lawyer who prides himself on never seeing the inside of a courtroom, until he finds purpose in defending two marines accused of murder. Cruise faces off with Jack Nicholson in one of the most iconic trial...
Published 07/20/21
Britney Spears’ battle against a guardianship that she says is unwarranted and abusive is a high-profile case, but it is far from the only one questioning the legal mechanism that can strip people of their rights to basic self-determination. On this week’s episode we talk with Law360 features reporter Cara Bayles about just what’s going on with the guardianship system. Also this week: Joe Exotic, the eccentric Oklahoma zookeeper at the center of Netflix’s hit documentary ‘Tiger King,’ wins an...
Published 07/16/21
For the first episode of our new summer movie series, we’re watching the iconic 2001 law school comedy “Legally Blonde,” in which sorority queen Elle Woods conquers Harvard Law. What, like it’s hard? What begins as a scheme to win back her boyfriend turns into a journey of self-realization for Elle, who teaches us along the way that lawyers come in all forms, and that staying true to yourself is the key to unlocking your full potential. Or, put another way: You can wear pink and still be a...
Published 07/13/21
This week we’re discussing the legal dimensions of the tragic collapse of the Champlain Towers condominium complex in Surfside, Florida. We unpack the litigation that has followed the disaster, the lawyers working the case pro bono, and the lessons to be learned that could help prevent future tragedies. Also this week, a wrap-up of the latest Supreme Court term with Law360 reporter Jimmy Hoover, and a Fifth Circuit ruling with big consequences for mandatory bar fees. Finally, stay tuned next...
Published 07/09/21
The hosts of the Pro Say podcast love talking about two things: the law and the movies. So we're going to spend our summer bringing them together for the Pro Say Movie Club, a new limited-run podcast series about the greatest films in legal cinema history — from “My Cousin Vinny” to “A Few Good Men” and everything in between. Episodes will drop every Tuesday starting on July 13, when we journey to Harvard Law School with Elle Woods in “Legally Blonde.”
Published 07/07/21
The Pennsylvania Supreme Court threw out Bill Cosby’s sexual assault conviction this week, ruling that the disgraced comedian was improperly prosecuted after being promised immunity. On this week’s show, the hosts break down the court’s decision and its implication for the post-#MeToo legal landscape. Also on the show, on the final day of the Supreme Court term, the justices uphold controversial voting restrictions in Arizona; and RobinHood is hit with a record regulatory fine for lax...
Published 07/02/21
The U.S. Supreme Court ruled this week that the NCAA violated federal antitrust laws by barring student athletes from receiving compensation. The decision wasn’t a sweeping overhaul for players, but it could open the door to new, broader challenges at a time when college sports are already changing. We’re joined this week by Law360 senior sports law reporter Zach Zagger to break down the ruling and what it might mean going forward. Also this week: Harvard University wins a lawsuit seeking...
Published 06/25/21