Episodes
One effort in trying to narrow the racial wealth gap is by supporting Black-owned businesses. That effort grew in 2020 amid racial justice protests after the murder of George Floyd, but where do things stand now? We check in. Plus, Brooklyn’s Long Time Tattoo is a queer Asian American Pacific Islander run tattoo collective that’s helping create an inclusive space for clients, other tattoo artists and the wider community.
Published 06/19/24
Published 06/19/24
Part of the of the racial wealth gap is a gap in business ownership. Today, we’re joined by Kezia Williams, CEO of the Black upStart, a national initiative and curriculum for Black entrepreneurs, for a conversation about some of the hurdles Black business owners face and efforts to close the gap. Also on the program: A new study finds that expanding early childhood education could be well worth the investment.
Published 06/19/24
From the BBC World Service: Amazon could be forced to recognize a trade union for the first time in the United Kingdom, as staff at its warehouse in Coventry, England, begin consulting with the GMB general trade union union ahead of a July vote. Also: An Afrobeats track has become the first of the genre to break one billion streams. We’ll explore the genre’s rapid growth.
Published 06/19/24
Yet another Boeing whistleblower is set to testify at a Senate hearing this afternoon, citing a failure to properly track defective parts in the company’s factories. Plus, the tragedy of errors and shortcuts that led to last year’s Titan submersible implosion.
Published 06/18/24
The Treasury and IRS announced a new initiative Monday to close a tax loophole for wealthy people that could raise more than $50 billion in revenue over the next decade. Plus, the evolving economics of “gayborhoods” in U.S. cities.
Published 06/18/24
From the BBC World Service: Russia’s Vladimir Putin is visiting North Korea and its leader Kim Jong Un for the first time in 24 years, as the pair look to deepen their relationship in the face of international isolation. And: Wildfires forced tens of thousands of people to evacuate the Greek island of Rhodes last year – now there’s a focus on how to make tourism more sustainable.
Published 06/18/24
Wall Street investors bet on extra rate cuts this year, in spite of Fed predictions that there will be just one. Plus, Megabus parent company Coach USA has filed for bankruptcy after ridership dropped during the pandemic and failed to recover. And for Baltimore firms, work on the Francis Scott Key Bridge reconstruction is personal.  
Published 06/17/24
Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy has called for cigarette-style warning labels aimed at young users of social media platforms, citing social media’s significant contributions to the mental health crisis among adolescents. Plus, a surge in secondhand shopping among consumers, and a look inside the world of gender-affirming vocal coaching.    
Published 06/17/24
From the BBC World Service: Emmanuel Macron has kicked off a fortnight of frenetic election campaigning as he gambles everything to stave off a big challenge from the far right. German sportswear giant Adidas is investigating what it calls ‘potential compliance violations in China’ after reports that senior managers at the Chinese branch allegedly received bribes from suppliers. The European Soccer Championship has kicked off and it offers significant branding opportunities — this year, Nike...
Published 06/17/24
Four years ago, the pandemic sent the world economy into disarray. Panic buying led to widespread backlogs, with shipping gridlocks so bad you could see them in satellite images. It all revealed a troubling reality: Our global supply chain is incredibly fragile. Where did things go wrong? We discuss. Also, Tesla shareholders voted to restore CEO Elon Musk’s pay package valued at $44.9 billion, so let’s talk about how CEO pay gets determined.
Published 06/14/24
Israel is withholding $35 million in tax revenues from the Palestinian Authority, which provides limited self-governance for the Palestinian people in the West Bank. The move threatens to worsen an already dire financial situation there, even as a war devastates Gaza, the other Palestinian enclave. Plus, big questions linger following the end of a strike at University of California campuses. And Wells Fargo fired some employees for “fake working.”
Published 06/14/24
From the BBC World Service: Every year, more than a million Muslims from around the globe make a pilgrimage in Mecca. But there’s a lucrative trade in fake permits, and the number of scams has caused raised concerns for Saudi authorities. Then, Thailand scraps a planned $8 tourism fee for visitors arriving by air. And Virgin Australia is set to allow dogs and cats to fly in the main cabin of its planes.
Published 06/14/24
Federal campaigns get much of the spotlight, but state and local races can be as consequential for residents’ lives. Funders know that. Today, we’ll trace some of this year’s campaign spending behind state elections, local elections and ballot initiatives. We’ll also hear about a G7 plan to use seized Russian assets to help Ukraine. Plus, inflation for wholesalers was negative last month. What’s a central bank to do with that?
Published 06/13/24
Gay bars are often a fixture of queer nightlife and can help foster a sense of community. Yet across the country, gay bars have shuttered at an alarming pace, down around 45% between 2002 and 2023. But queer nightlife isn’t disappearing — it may just be evolving. We’ll hear more. But first: Interest rates are staying where they are, so where do we go from here?
Published 06/13/24
From the BBC World Service: Demonstrators argued that the measures, which include cutting state spending and watering down workers’ rights, will hurt millions of working Argentinians. Meanwhile, leaders of the G7 are meeting in Italy to discuss increasing economic pressure on Russia in response to its war against Ukraine. And around the world, hundreds of thousands of tons of nuclear waste are piling up in temporary storage, but Finland thinks it has a solution.
Published 06/13/24
The general public doesn’t always see eye-to-eye with economists on why inflation happens or on how to fight it, a new survey finds. We’ll unpack. Plus, a resilient U.S. economy lifts global economic outlook. And later: The Federal Reserve is expected to leave interest rates unchanged today. But let’s revisit the ’70s and ’80s, when the Fed was battling double-digit inflation and didn’t have the luxury of patiently holding interest rates steady.
Published 06/12/24
It’s been called the largest economic development project in Georgia’s history. And it’s massive — six times the size of Disneyland. When Hyundai’s Metaplant comes online, it will pump out up to 300,000 electric vehicles per year, plus batteries. Jobs at the plant will pay more than the area average, and job training will be free of charge. We’ll hear more. Also on the program: banishing medical debt from credit reports.
Published 06/12/24
From the BBC World Service: The European Commission will add tariffs to electric vehicles coming into the European Union from China, and China’s not too happy about it. Then, the World Health Organization (WHO) has blamed major industries — tobacco, ultra-processed foods, fossil fuels and alcohol — for 2.7 million deaths a year in Europe. Also: news on bread in Egypt and spicy ramen noodles in Denmark.
Published 06/12/24
We’re heading into another summer with the specter of serious supply chain disruptions. The union representing dockworkers at ports on the East and Gulf Coasts has called off negotiations with shipping companies, because the union says those companies are trying to replace workers with automation. Also: a look at how failing to meet kids’ basic needs hurts their educational outcomes and how bankruptcy has become an “escape hatch” for big corporations.
Published 06/11/24
Today, we’re heading to the Georgia-South Carolina border to hear about a program that pays as they train. It’s at the Savannah River Site, overseen by the Department of Energy, where workers do everything from from dimming down highly toxic plutonium into something no longer weapons-grade to processing spent fuel rods pulled from nuclear reactors. Also on the show: a lawsuit over forever chemicals in the nation’s drinking water.
Published 06/11/24
From the BBC World Service: Singapore Airlines has offered $10,000 compensation payments to passengers who suffered minor injuries during a flight that hit sudden, extreme turbulence last month. Then, European soccer championships kick off on Friday, and a thriving market has popped up to sell counterfeit replica kits. And later: Nollywood, Nigeria’s movie industry, could be worth as much as $15 billion by 2025, but questions are being raised over safety.
Published 06/11/24
The Federal Reserve’s Open Market Committee meets tomorrow and Wednesday for its fourth interest rate-setting meeting of the year. We can say with almost total certainty that the Fed will do nothing to those interest rates, and recent news on the job market isn’t likely to change the Fed’s thinking. Then, Reddit is pushing deeper into advertising. And later: how the Tribeca Festival came to be such a moneymaker for New York City.
Published 06/10/24
You know the Georgia peach logo at the end of shows like “WandaVision” or “The Walking Dead?” The peach means a production was filmed in Georgia, where major tax credits are helping the state grow its film industry. Today, we head to Atlanta to hear about the pipeline for show business gigs there. Plus, Americans are paying down their credit card balances thanks to a strong labor market.
Published 06/10/24
From the BBC World Service: France’s President Emmanuel Macron has called snap parliamentary elections in the wake of a big victory for rival Marine Le Pen’s National Rally in the European Parliament vote. We’ll unpack. Then, Malaysia is ending its blanket subsidy for diesel, which means prices will go up by 50%. And Honda is the latest Japanese carmaker to be inspected for safety certification issues.
Published 06/10/24