Episodes
Inflation actually cooled off, just a touch, according to a key measure. We talk to Michael Hewson of CMC Markets in London about what slowing interest rate hikes could mean for an economy. Also, the head of the European Council met up with China’s president.
Published 12/01/22
Published 12/01/22
Fed Chair Jerome Powell offered some clues about that this week. Also, Giving Tuesday numbers show a growing sense of generosity. Then, we look at the speculation looming over Germany’s leadership as it pertains to relations with China.
Published 12/01/22
From the BBC World Service: An official visit by Charles Michel to Beijing comes amid persisting economic tensions between the two sides. Kenya’s president William Ruto has unveiled a new program to offer cheaper loans to entrepreneurs. It’s called the Hustler Fund – so named because on the campaign trail, Ruto said represented what he called the “hustler nation” of millions of young Kenyans struggling to make ends meet. UNESCO has added the French baguette to its “intangible cultural...
Published 12/01/22
A revised GDP report from the Commerce Department shows nearly 3% growth. Private sector jobs grew as well, but fell way short of expectations. We dive in further with Susan Schmidt. Also, frozen Russian assets might come in handy in helping Ukraine. Finally, we report on the death of Jiang Zemin, the former president of China.
Published 11/30/22
The move was quietly made last week. Elsewhere, tens of thousands of striking academic workers appear to have a reached a deal with the University of California system. Then, we check in on Fight for $15 after 10 years.
Published 11/30/22
From the BBC World Service: European commission president Ursula von der Leyen has proposed taking Russian assets that have been frozen in Europe and using them to compensate for wartime damages. Unrest has continued overnight in various Chinese cities as protesters call for an end to strict COVID measures. And if your flight is cancelled or severely delayed in the U.S., you’re entitled to compensation. In Australia, travelers no such guarantees, so consumer groups are pushing for better...
Published 11/30/22
Today is the eve of Fed Chair Jerome Powell’s speech, where he’s expected to lay out the current economic landscape and offer hints as to what the Fed might do with it in a couple of weeks. For more, we talk with Karen Petrou of Federal Financial Analytics. The BBC examines China’s renewed focus on vaccines as it deals with uproar over its zero-COVID restrictions.
Published 11/29/22
The House is considering legislation that would impose a compromise labor agreement this week. The BBC checks in with more from China. Facebook parent company Meta steps into more fines regarding how it handles data privacy.
Published 11/29/22
From the BBC World Service: Beijing vowed today to boost the COVID vaccination rate for people 80 and older. Brazil’s president-elect has presented a new budget to Congress, which circumvents the nation’s strict budget ceiling rules. And this year marks the 25th anniversary of the opening of the Guggenheim Museum in the city of Bilbao, in northern Spain. Perhaps its biggest legacy is a phenomenon now known as the “Guggenheim effect” – when a single iconic building helps to drive urban...
Published 11/29/22
We check in on some of the results from Black Friday as Cyber Monday gets underway. Julia Coronado of MacroPolicy Perspectives gives us her take on what the shopping could tell us about inflation. Then, we take a look at regenerative agriculture and how restaurants could be pitching in on it.
Published 11/28/22
China correspondent Jennifer Pak checks in with the latest. Also, we speak to Los Angeles mayor Eric Garcetti about the Summer Olympics – with all the costs it can incur – coming to town in 2028.
Published 11/28/22
From the BBC World Service: Stock markets in Shanghai, Hong Kong and other places in Asia have fallen as anti-government protests spread across China. Ukraine’s use of Turkish-made drones has made the world take notice. The BBC sits down with the brothers who run drone manufacturing at their Istanbul offices.
Published 11/28/22
As holiday shopping kicks off today, we check in on what could await consumers and retailers alike. Most of the people responding to a University of Michigan survey think it’s a bad time to buy a house. There’s a new gold-oriented currency making its way around four states, but is it a worthy venture?
Published 11/25/22
The week of Thanksgiving is typically the busiest in terms of travel, but remote work has found ways to take the pressure off. Then, we look into the importance of the final two months of the year when it comes to holiday retail. Also, we speak to a New York Times reporter about a special way countries are fighting both debt and climate change.
Published 11/25/22
From the BBC World Service: South Korea’s capital, Seoul, is offering cash rewards of around $150/month to people who leave their cheap basement properties. The city is trying to phase out these out after four people drowned during severe flooding last summer. A new type of flu vaccine, which could offer protection against all known strains of flu, could soon begin human trials. And as Black Friday kicks off the holiday shopping season, retailers across Europe worry it could be the worst...
Published 11/25/22
First, the BBC checks in on China, which is facing more COVID-related challenges. More homeowners are getting thankful for HELOCs – we’ll explain. A avian flu epidemic is one reason your turkey may have cost more than usual, and the issue is even worse in other parts of the world.
Published 11/24/22
The aviation industry argues that 5G cell phone network will mess with altimeters. The BBC reports from the Ukrainian capital of Kyiv, which is still mostly without power following Russian attacks. We speak with the CEO of an atypical food business about what it’s been like to navigate an unpredictable economy.
Published 11/24/22
From the BBC World Service: The U.K. is experiencing a turkey shortage due to its biggest-ever outbreak of bird flu. That’s impacting U.S. expats this Thanksgiving, as well as many British families who would normally cook a turkey at Christmas. And the International Monetary Fund is calling on China to boost vaccinations and reconsider its zero-COVID strategy.
Published 11/24/22
Attorneys representing the fallen crypto giant shared a tale of mismanagement and misplaced funds during a bankruptcy hearing. Susan Schmidt tells us investors won’t make any big market moves today. Chris Farrell joins us to discuss how an older workforce can still be a benefit to the economy.
Published 11/23/22
The factory’s workers appear to be upset over restrictions, such as having to actually live at the workplace. Also, this year’s holiday shopping season could feel familiar. People in rural communities face unique challenges that can compromise their physical and economic health.
Published 11/23/22
From the BBC World Service: Workers at the world’s largest iPhone factory in China have staged violent demonstrations to demand better conditions amid strict COVID regulations. Indonesia’s government has vowed to help with the cost to rebuild about 20,000 homes damaged by a devastating earthquake. The U.K.’s Supreme Court has ruled that the Scottish government does not have power to ask its voters whether the country should break away from the U.K.
Published 11/23/22
Diane Swonk of KPMG joins us to talk about how holiday discounts could be even deeper this season. We try to determine which way the oil-producing cartel OPEC+ is leaning. Also, why are schools and students attractive hacker targets?
Published 11/22/22
We have the latest on the growing potential for a strike, as another union votes against a contract deal. Plus, we talk with an expert on how a dimmer economic outlook has led to people holding back on spending big.
Published 11/22/22
From the BBC World Service: Giorgia Meloni and her cabinet have approved a series of spending measures for next year. One of Ukraine’s largest energy companies has warned that rolling blackouts might last until the end of March. And the U.K.’s National Health Service is trialing a program to allow doctors to prescribe heating for some patients who can’t afford their energy bills.
Published 11/22/22