Episodes
The newspaper Bild has long poured vitriol on the country’s left-wingers and ‘do gooders’. But now it has a new target: the chancellor. By Thomas Meaney. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Published 08/10/20
Mass internment camps did not begin or end with the Nazis – today they are everywhere from China to Europe to the US. How can we stop their spread? By Daniel Trilling. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Published 08/07/20
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2015: Romania’s orphanages shocked the world when they were first exposed in 1989. But what happened to the children left behind? Vişinel Balan, now 27, tells his story. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Published 08/05/20
Aisha Wakil knew many of Boko Haram’s fighters as children. Now she uses those ties to broker peace deals, mediate hostage negotiations and convince militants to put down their weapons – but as the violence escalates, her task is becoming impossible. By Chika Oduah. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Published 08/03/20
Nestlé’s sleek, chic capsule system changed the way we drink coffee. But in an age when everyone’s a coffee snob and waste is wickedness, can it survive? By Ed Cumming. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Published 07/31/20
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2015: Ota Benga was kidnapped from Congo in 1904 and taken to the US, where he was exhibited with monkeys. His appalling story reveals the roots of a racial prejudice that still haunts us. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Published 07/29/20
For seven decades, India has been held together by its constitution, which promises equality to all. But Narendra Modi’s BJP is remaking the nation into one where some people count as more Indian than others. By Samanth Subramanian. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Published 07/27/20
As social media has become more inhospitable, the appeal of private online groups has grown. But they hold their own dangers – to those both inside and out. By William Davies. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Published 07/24/20
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2015: Kevin Wheatcroft has quietly amassed the world’s largest collection of Nazi memorabilia. Now he wants to share it with the world. What is behind this dark obsession?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Published 07/22/20
The unmasking of the Salisbury poisoning suspects by a new digital journalism outfit was an embarrassment for Putin – and evidence that Russian spies are not what they once were. By Luke Harding. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Published 07/20/20
A police raid on a gay bar in New York led to the birth of the Pride movement half a century ago – but the fight for LGBTQ+ rights goes back much further than that. By Huw Lemmey. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Published 07/17/20
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2015: A series of experiments has produced incredible results by giving young blood to old mice. Now the findings are being tested on humans. Ian Sample meets the scientists whose research could transform our lives. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Published 07/15/20
After years of outsourcing, many essential staff work for the NHS without receiving its benefits. In one London hospital, the fight is on for a better deal. By Sophie Elmhirst. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Published 07/13/20
The pandemic has devastated global tourism, and many will say ‘good riddance’ to overcrowded cities and rubbish-strewn natural wonders. Is there any way to reinvent an industry that does so much damage? By Christopher de Bellaigue. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Published 07/10/20
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2015: Amid the mayhem that has turned parts of Karachi into no-go zones, reporters risk their lives to make sense of a crime wave that is virtually an insurgency. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Published 07/08/20
After losing four pregnancies, Jennie Agg set out to unravel the science of miscarriage. Then, a few months in, she found out she was pregnant again – just as the coronavirus pandemic hit. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Published 07/06/20
In the northern region of La Rioja, one medieval town has suffered a particularly deadly outbreak. And in such a tight-knit community, suspicion and recrimination can spread as fast as the virus. By Giles Tremlett. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Published 07/03/20
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2016: CBeebies isn’t just a channel, it’s a culture – and as a new parent you have little choice but to surrender to it. By Sophie Elmhirst. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Published 07/01/20
Hong Kong used to be seen as cautious, pragmatic and materialistic. But in the past year, an increasingly bold protest movement has transformed the city. Now, as Beijing tightens its grip, how much longer can the movement survive? By Tania Branigan and Lily Kuo. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Published 06/29/20
Even before the pandemic, mass gatherings were under threat from draconian laws and corporate seizure of public space. Yet history shows that the crowd always finds a way to return. By Dan Hancox. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Published 06/26/20
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2015: Myles Jackman is on a mission to change Britain’s obscenity laws. For him, it’s more than a job – it’s a moral calling. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Published 06/24/20
Many have attempted to claim that ‘things are better here’ for black people than in the US. This ignores both Europe’s colonial past and its own racist present. By Gary Younge. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Published 06/22/20
When he was six, Paul Alexander contracted polio and was paralysed for life. Today he is 74, and one of the last people in the world still using an iron lung. But after surviving one deadly outbreak, he did not expect to find himself threatened by another. By Linda Rodriguez McRobbie. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Published 06/19/20
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This time we revisit Felicity Lawrence’s 2016 report on the exploitation of migrant labour in the UK: In the bleak flatlands of East Anglia, workers are controlled by criminal gangs, and some are forced to commit crimes to pay off their debts. This is what happens when cheap labour is our only priority. Help support our independent journalism at...
Published 06/17/20
For decades, anti-government and white supremacist groups have been attempting to recruit police officers – and the authorities themselves aren’t even certain about the scale of the problem. By Maddy Crowell and Sylvia Varnham O’Regan. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Published 06/15/20